Cock Fight(鬪鷄)

Cock Fight

Headword

닭싸움 ( 鬪鷄 , Dakssaum )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Game

Writer YooSeunghoon(柳承勳)

People of all ages in traditional Korea were fond of cock fights which pitted two trained roosters against each other. Currently known mostly as tugye (Kor. 투계, Chin. 鬪鷄) rooster fights are hosted as part of folk festivals or events.

Although widely spread across Korea, rooster fights have been particularly popular in the southeastern part of the country. According to the “Rural Pastimes of Joseon” (Kor. 조선의 향토오락, Jap. 朝鮮の鄕土娛樂, 1941) by Murayama Jijun, there were eight places to hold rooster fights on a regular basis in South Gyeongsang Province – the highest number among the regions. Those places included Jinyang, Haman, Changnyeong, Miryang, Ulsan, Gimhae, Goseong and Sacheon.

Traditional cock fights in Changnyeong take place in the following manner. The main species of the rooster in the fights are the Shamo, native of India, the Hando of Japan, and the Uduri, a cross-breed species of domestic origin. They are fed snakes, mudfish, and eggs. This protein-rich diet helps them grow taller and have an especially long neck. In order to keep the rooster’s neck agile, the owner goes around it in circles when feeding it. Two or three months after being hatched, fighting roosters are put into individual cages. Training begins when a rooster turns eight to nine months of age. Cock fights are held inside an enclosed arena and the rooster that hits the ground with its belly or whose beak touches the ground first loses. Fighting techniques include the front attack, rear attack, and jaw attack. The rooster weighs 4.5 to 5 kilograms on average, so when it flings itself towards the opponent to attack its head, the blow can be quite severe. A cock fight can sometimes last over an hour. The fight frequently involves betting. The owner of the winning rooster receives about 10% of the wager with the rest going to the winning bidder.

Cock Fight

Cock Fight
Headword

닭싸움 ( 鬪鷄 , Dakssaum )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Game

Writer YooSeunghoon(柳承勳)

People of all ages in traditional Korea were fond of cock fights which pitted two trained roosters against each other. Currently known mostly as tugye (Kor. 투계, Chin. 鬪鷄) rooster fights are hosted as part of folk festivals or events.

Although widely spread across Korea, rooster fights have been particularly popular in the southeastern part of the country. According to the “Rural Pastimes of Joseon” (Kor. 조선의 향토오락, Jap. 朝鮮の鄕土娛樂, 1941) by Murayama Jijun, there were eight places to hold rooster fights on a regular basis in South Gyeongsang Province – the highest number among the regions. Those places included Jinyang, Haman, Changnyeong, Miryang, Ulsan, Gimhae, Goseong and Sacheon.

Traditional cock fights in Changnyeong take place in the following manner. The main species of the rooster in the fights are the Shamo, native of India, the Hando of Japan, and the Uduri, a cross-breed species of domestic origin. They are fed snakes, mudfish, and eggs. This protein-rich diet helps them grow taller and have an especially long neck. In order to keep the rooster’s neck agile, the owner goes around it in circles when feeding it. Two or three months after being hatched, fighting roosters are put into individual cages. Training begins when a rooster turns eight to nine months of age. Cock fights are held inside an enclosed arena and the rooster that hits the ground with its belly or whose beak touches the ground first loses. Fighting techniques include the front attack, rear attack, and jaw attack. The rooster weighs 4.5 to 5 kilograms on average, so when it flings itself towards the opponent to attack its head, the blow can be quite severe. A cock fight can sometimes last over an hour. The fight frequently involves betting. The owner of the winning rooster receives about 10% of the wager with the rest going to the winning bidder.