Relocation of a grave(移葬)

Relocation of a grave

Headword

이장 ( 移葬 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Moving a corpse or remains, buried, enshrined or naturally interred, to such new locations as a grave, a shrine or a natural burial site.

The traditional ijang procedure is similar to that of burial. Once ijang is decided, a burial site is first selected, and then a coffin and hyo (Kor. 효, Chin. 絞, lit. silk string) for yeom (wrapping a dressed corpse with hemp cloth or a thin blanket) are prepared. To prepare for burial, gwangjung (Kor. 광중, Chin. 壙中, pit to bury the coffin in) is dug, and the ancestors are informed of the event at the shrine on the day before. On the day ijang takes place, an ancestral rite is offered to the god of land by the officiant and the grave is opened. When the coffin is taken out and laid in state, a ritual tribute is paid. The corpse goes through daeryeom (Kor. 대렴, Chin. 大殮, shrouding a corpse with clothes and blankets once again). When finished, the new coffin is placed on the bier and barin (Kor. 발인, Chin. 發靷, departure of the funeral bier from home) begins.

Arriving at the new location, the corpse is laid at a waiting station, and a memorial rite is observed for the god of land at the left side of the grave. The remaining procedures are the same as those of the original burial. When the burial is over, jeon (a ritual of offering food to the deceased) is performed and the family returns to the home. After informing the ancestors at the family shrine of the event, the sinju (Kor. 신주, Chin. 神主, spirit tablet of a deceased person) is enshrined and a memorial rite is held. The procedures of ijang are almost the same as those of the actual burial, except that an extra shroud is not necessary and the corpse is not washed. Reasons for ijang vary including natural disasters, litigation, real estate dealings, property rights, privatization of a family mountain and geomancy (Kor. pungsu, Chin. feng shui). Recently, land development has become the reason for relocation of graves.

Relocation of a grave

Relocation of a grave
Headword

이장 ( 移葬 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Moving a corpse or remains, buried, enshrined or naturally interred, to such new locations as a grave, a shrine or a natural burial site.

The traditional ijang procedure is similar to that of burial. Once ijang is decided, a burial site is first selected, and then a coffin and hyo (Kor. 효, Chin. 絞, lit. silk string) for yeom (wrapping a dressed corpse with hemp cloth or a thin blanket) are prepared. To prepare for burial, gwangjung (Kor. 광중, Chin. 壙中, pit to bury the coffin in) is dug, and the ancestors are informed of the event at the shrine on the day before. On the day ijang takes place, an ancestral rite is offered to the god of land by the officiant and the grave is opened. When the coffin is taken out and laid in state, a ritual tribute is paid. The corpse goes through daeryeom (Kor. 대렴, Chin. 大殮, shrouding a corpse with clothes and blankets once again). When finished, the new coffin is placed on the bier and barin (Kor. 발인, Chin. 發靷, departure of the funeral bier from home) begins.

Arriving at the new location, the corpse is laid at a waiting station, and a memorial rite is observed for the god of land at the left side of the grave. The remaining procedures are the same as those of the original burial. When the burial is over, jeon (a ritual of offering food to the deceased) is performed and the family returns to the home. After informing the ancestors at the family shrine of the event, the sinju (Kor. 신주, Chin. 神主, spirit tablet of a deceased person) is enshrined and a memorial rite is held. The procedures of ijang are almost the same as those of the actual burial, except that an extra shroud is not necessary and the corpse is not washed. Reasons for ijang vary including natural disasters, litigation, real estate dealings, property rights, privatization of a family mountain and geomancy (Kor. pungsu, Chin. feng shui). Recently, land development has become the reason for relocation of graves.