Dano Amulets(端午符籍)

Dano Amulets

Headword

단오부적 ( 端午符籍 , Dano Bujeok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 5th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimJongdae(金宗大)

Dano Bujeok (Kor. 단오부적, Chin. 端午符籍) is a talisman made on the day of Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, the fifth of the fifth lunar month). It can also be called Danobu (Kor. 단오부, Chin. 端午符, lit. Dano Talisman), Cheonjung Bujeok (Kor. 천중부적, Chin. 天中符籍, lit. Talisman of Zenith) and Chiu Bujeok (Kor. 치우부적, Chin. 蚩尤符籍, lit. Chiu’s Talisman). Dano was considered an occasion to prepare talismans because, in the traditional worldview, it was the day of the most profuse yang energy, which could help expel miscellaneous ghosts and get rid of all bad luck and misfortunes in the family. Accordingly, many housewives went to nearby temples and acquired paper talismans which they hung above a door or on a kitchen wall. The custom of carving hair pins with changpo root (a variety of iris, Kor. 창포, Chin. 菖蒲, Acorus calamus var. angustatus) was also assigned an evil-prevention quality.

The efforts to use the beneficial yang energy of Dano could be observed in the royal court as well. During the Joseon period (1392~1910) medical practitioners in the Naeuiwon (Kor. 내의원, Chin, 內醫院, Palace Pharmacy) prepared medicine for the king, such as jehotang (Kor. 제호탕, Chin. 醍醐湯, milk-and-arrowroot drink) and okchudan (Kor. 옥추단, Chin. 玉樞丹, lit. jade-hinge pill). According to the Dongguk Sesigi (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849), the Gwangsanggam (Kor. 관상감, Chin. 觀象監, Office for Observance of Natural Phenomena) made prints in red ink and attached them to the doorposts of palace buildings in an effort to expel evil forces. The book also contains a record that a similar custom of posting evil-chasing prints on Dano was maintained in the aristocratic families throughout the country.

Dano Amulets

Dano Amulets
Headword

단오부적 ( 端午符籍 , Dano Bujeok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 5th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimJongdae(金宗大)

Dano Bujeok (Kor. 단오부적, Chin. 端午符籍) is a talisman made on the day of Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, the fifth of the fifth lunar month). It can also be called Danobu (Kor. 단오부, Chin. 端午符, lit. Dano Talisman), Cheonjung Bujeok (Kor. 천중부적, Chin. 天中符籍, lit. Talisman of Zenith) and Chiu Bujeok (Kor. 치우부적, Chin. 蚩尤符籍, lit. Chiu’s Talisman). Dano was considered an occasion to prepare talismans because, in the traditional worldview, it was the day of the most profuse yang energy, which could help expel miscellaneous ghosts and get rid of all bad luck and misfortunes in the family. Accordingly, many housewives went to nearby temples and acquired paper talismans which they hung above a door or on a kitchen wall. The custom of carving hair pins with changpo root (a variety of iris, Kor. 창포, Chin. 菖蒲, Acorus calamus var. angustatus) was also assigned an evil-prevention quality.

The efforts to use the beneficial yang energy of Dano could be observed in the royal court as well. During the Joseon period (1392~1910) medical practitioners in the Naeuiwon (Kor. 내의원, Chin, 內醫院, Palace Pharmacy) prepared medicine for the king, such as jehotang (Kor. 제호탕, Chin. 醍醐湯, milk-and-arrowroot drink) and okchudan (Kor. 옥추단, Chin. 玉樞丹, lit. jade-hinge pill). According to the Dongguk Sesigi (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849), the Gwangsanggam (Kor. 관상감, Chin. 觀象監, Office for Observance of Natural Phenomena) made prints in red ink and attached them to the doorposts of palace buildings in an effort to expel evil forces. The book also contains a record that a similar custom of posting evil-chasing prints on Dano was maintained in the aristocratic families throughout the country.