Nabil Rite(臘享)

Nabil Rite

Headword

납향 ( 臘享 , Naphyang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JungSeungmo(鄭勝謨)

Naphyang (Kor. 납향, Chin. 臘享, lit. Nabil rite) refers to the worship service held on Nabil (Kor. 납일, Chin. 臘日, Hunting Day, falls in the twelfth lunar month) and is intended to inform the gods about the major events of the year as well as the outcome of the year’s farming. The custom is also known as nappyeongje (Kor. 납평제, Chin. 臘平祭), palsa (Kor. 팔사, Chin. 八蜡), sa (Kor. 사, Chin. 蜡), or ja (Kor. 자, Chin. 䄍). Long time ago, the day of the naphyang service, Nabil, used to be the third Day of the Pig following Dongji (Kor. 동지, Chin. 冬至, Winter Solstice). Then, during the reign of King Taejo (1335-1408), the founding king of Joseon (1392-1910), Nabil was changed to the third day after Dongji that contained the celestial stem mi (Kor. 미일, Chin. 未日). State rituals were held on this day at Jongmyo (Kor. 종묘, Chin. 宗廟, Royal Ancestral Shrine) and Sajik (Kor. 사직, Chin. 社稷, Royal Ancestral Altar).

Sacrificial ceremonies to the royal ancestral spirits were performed five times a year at Jongmyo (during the first ten days of the first month of each season and on Nabil). These rites were the most sumptuous seasonal events hosted in the royal court, while smaller worship services also took place on seasonal holidays such as Seol (Kor. 설, Lunar New Year), Hansik (Kor. 한식, Chin. 寒食, Cold Food Day), Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, Festival of the Fifth Day of the Fifth Month), Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival), and Dongji. According to the records of the Joseon period, naphyang was observed in both aristocratic families and ordinary households.

Nabil Rite

Nabil Rite
Headword

납향 ( 臘享 , Naphyang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JungSeungmo(鄭勝謨)

Naphyang (Kor. 납향, Chin. 臘享, lit. Nabil rite) refers to the worship service held on Nabil (Kor. 납일, Chin. 臘日, Hunting Day, falls in the twelfth lunar month) and is intended to inform the gods about the major events of the year as well as the outcome of the year’s farming. The custom is also known as nappyeongje (Kor. 납평제, Chin. 臘平祭), palsa (Kor. 팔사, Chin. 八蜡), sa (Kor. 사, Chin. 蜡), or ja (Kor. 자, Chin. 䄍). Long time ago, the day of the naphyang service, Nabil, used to be the third Day of the Pig following Dongji (Kor. 동지, Chin. 冬至, Winter Solstice). Then, during the reign of King Taejo (1335-1408), the founding king of Joseon (1392-1910), Nabil was changed to the third day after Dongji that contained the celestial stem mi (Kor. 미일, Chin. 未日). State rituals were held on this day at Jongmyo (Kor. 종묘, Chin. 宗廟, Royal Ancestral Shrine) and Sajik (Kor. 사직, Chin. 社稷, Royal Ancestral Altar).

Sacrificial ceremonies to the royal ancestral spirits were performed five times a year at Jongmyo (during the first ten days of the first month of each season and on Nabil). These rites were the most sumptuous seasonal events hosted in the royal court, while smaller worship services also took place on seasonal holidays such as Seol (Kor. 설, Lunar New Year), Hansik (Kor. 한식, Chin. 寒食, Cold Food Day), Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, Festival of the Fifth Day of the Fifth Month), Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival), and Dongji. According to the records of the Joseon period, naphyang was observed in both aristocratic families and ordinary households.