Swinging(荡秋千)

Swinging

Headword

그네뛰기 ( 荡秋千 , Geune Ttwigi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 5th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JeonSinjae(全信宰)

Geune ttwigi (Kor. 그네뛰기, Chin. 鞦韆戱, swinging) was one of the most popular outdoor games played by young women on Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, the fifth of the fifth lunar month). A traditional Korean swing was made by suspending a wooden plank by ropes from a high tree branch or the crossbar of a wooden frame. Young women rode the swing by propelling their legs forwards and backwards like a pendulum.

The earliest accounts of swinging were recorded during the Goryeo Period (918-1392). According to the “Folk Entertainments of Korea” (Kor. 조선의 향토오락, Jap. 朝鮮の鄕土娛樂, 1941) by Murayama Jijun (村山智順, 1891-1968), a Japanese researcher, swinging was a main source of entertainment at festivals in 216 out of 227 areas that he surveyed. His survey also revealed that young women enjoyed swinging during the Dano Festival in most parts of Korea. In some areas it was practiced for about a month, from Buddha’s Birthday to Dano, with even some community men participating in the event.

In traditional society, the Dano Festival gave young Korean women an opportunity to free themselves from the pressure of daily housework. They could take part in the fun and, with swinging, enjoy the excitement of flying into the air. According to folk belief from the time, swinging on Dano helped prevent mosquito bites and protected women from the intense summer heat.

Sound clips

more

Swinging

Swinging
Headword

그네뛰기 ( 荡秋千 , Geune Ttwigi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 5th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JeonSinjae(全信宰)

Geune ttwigi (Kor. 그네뛰기, Chin. 鞦韆戱, swinging) was one of the most popular outdoor games played by young women on Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, the fifth of the fifth lunar month). A traditional Korean swing was made by suspending a wooden plank by ropes from a high tree branch or the crossbar of a wooden frame. Young women rode the swing by propelling their legs forwards and backwards like a pendulum.

The earliest accounts of swinging were recorded during the Goryeo Period (918-1392). According to the “Folk Entertainments of Korea” (Kor. 조선의 향토오락, Jap. 朝鮮の鄕土娛樂, 1941) by Murayama Jijun (村山智順, 1891-1968), a Japanese researcher, swinging was a main source of entertainment at festivals in 216 out of 227 areas that he surveyed. His survey also revealed that young women enjoyed swinging during the Dano Festival in most parts of Korea. In some areas it was practiced for about a month, from Buddha’s Birthday to Dano, with even some community men participating in the event.

In traditional society, the Dano Festival gave young Korean women an opportunity to free themselves from the pressure of daily housework. They could take part in the fun and, with swinging, enjoy the excitement of flying into the air. According to folk belief from the time, swinging on Dano helped prevent mosquito bites and protected women from the intense summer heat.