Wearing five different types of mourning clothes(五服制度)

Wearing five different types of mourning clothes

Headword

오복제도 ( 五服制度 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

A system in which five different types of mounrning clothes are worn depending on the mourners’ degree of closeness to the deceased person.

When Confucian funerals became the cultural standard in the Joseon period, mourning clothes were worn strictly according to obokjedo as described in “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi). The mourning clothes were divided into five kinds depending on the mourner’s closeness to the deceased, seniority, and gender. Getting along with relatives, respecting jonjok (Kor. 존족, Chin. 尊族, lit. high and noble clan), revering elders, and distinguishing between men and women were moral rules that could never be changed. Bok in obok refers to conformity and obedience.

The obokjedo system includes chamchoe (Kor. 참최, Chin. 斬衰, garment worn at the funeral of direct ancestors made of rough hemp with the hems folded, not sewn), jaechoe (Kor. 재최, Chin. 齋衰, funeral garment made of slightly thick hemp with the hems narrowly folded and sewn), daegong (Kor. 대공, Chin. 大功, funeral garment made of thick hemp), sogong (Kor. 소공, Chin. 小功, funeral garment made of slightly thin hemp), and sima (Kor. 시마, Chin. 緦麻, funeral garment made of thin hemp). Wearing daegong or above indicates intimacy with the deceased, and wearing sogong or below means a distant relationship with the deceased. In addition, there is a system of four mourning garments, categorized according to whether the mourner is an anscestor or descendant, or has a close relationship to the deceased person or not. Jeongbok (Kor. 정복, Chin. 正服) is formal bonbok (Kor. 본복, Chin. 本服) worn by blood relatives; uibok (Kor. 의복, Chin. 義服) is for those related by marriage or adoption; gabok (Kor. 가복, Chin. 加服) is worn over bonbok and results in heavy layering; and gangbok (Kor. 강복, Chin. 降服) is worn by a married daughter or an adopted son for his biological parents.

Wearing five different types of mourning clothes

Wearing five different types of mourning clothes
Headword

오복제도 ( 五服制度 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

A system in which five different types of mounrning clothes are worn depending on the mourners’ degree of closeness to the deceased person.

When Confucian funerals became the cultural standard in the Joseon period, mourning clothes were worn strictly according to obokjedo as described in “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi). The mourning clothes were divided into five kinds depending on the mourner’s closeness to the deceased, seniority, and gender. Getting along with relatives, respecting jonjok (Kor. 존족, Chin. 尊族, lit. high and noble clan), revering elders, and distinguishing between men and women were moral rules that could never be changed. Bok in obok refers to conformity and obedience.

The obokjedo system includes chamchoe (Kor. 참최, Chin. 斬衰, garment worn at the funeral of direct ancestors made of rough hemp with the hems folded, not sewn), jaechoe (Kor. 재최, Chin. 齋衰, funeral garment made of slightly thick hemp with the hems narrowly folded and sewn), daegong (Kor. 대공, Chin. 大功, funeral garment made of thick hemp), sogong (Kor. 소공, Chin. 小功, funeral garment made of slightly thin hemp), and sima (Kor. 시마, Chin. 緦麻, funeral garment made of thin hemp). Wearing daegong or above indicates intimacy with the deceased, and wearing sogong or below means a distant relationship with the deceased. In addition, there is a system of four mourning garments, categorized according to whether the mourner is an anscestor or descendant, or has a close relationship to the deceased person or not. Jeongbok (Kor. 정복, Chin. 正服) is formal bonbok (Kor. 본복, Chin. 本服) worn by blood relatives; uibok (Kor. 의복, Chin. 義服) is for those related by marriage or adoption; gabok (Kor. 가복, Chin. 加服) is worn over bonbok and results in heavy layering; and gangbok (Kor. 강복, Chin. 降服) is worn by a married daughter or an adopted son for his biological parents.