Lit. bathing and shrouding(殮襲)

Lit. bathing and shrouding

Headword

염습 ( 殮襲 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Bathing the body of a deceased person, dressing it in su-ui (Kor. 수의, Chin. 襚衣, lit. burial garments), and shrouding it to enclose it in a coffin. It consists of three procedures: seup (bathing and dressing the body of the deceased), soryeom (shrouding the body of the deceased in a cloth), and daeryeom (shrouding the body of the deceased in a cloth one more time and placing it in the coffin).

Seup is bathing the body of the deceased and dressing it in su-ui on the day of death.

Soryeom is shrouding the body in a cloth on the second day of death. The cloth should be in two layers, and old clothes of the deceased are used to stuff any gaps to protect the body. Straps are needed to tie the wrapped body— three straps for horizontal tying and one strap for vertical tying. The ends of the straps are cut into three pieces to make tying easy. The horizontal straps should be long enough to wrap around the body and the vertical strap to wrap the head and feet and tie it at the navel.

After bathing and dressing the body of the deceased, it is moved on to a piece of prepared cloth. A silk-lined garment is rolled up and placed under the head instead of a pillow, and the two ends of the silk garment are rolled up to fill the gaps above the shoulders. Other old clothes are used to fill the gaps between the legs and beside the legs, and to cover the body. The body is then wrapped in the cloth on which it is placed, the feet first, then the head, then the left side and right side. The body is wrapped with the straps, vertically first and then horizontally, with the ends tucked in rather than knotted. Lastly the body is covered with a cloth.

Daeryeom is shrouding the body of the deceased one more time and placing it in the coffin. It is done on the third day after death to give time for the deceased to come back to life. After the body is placed in the coffin, the empty spaces are filled with old clothes of the deceased, a practice called bogong (Kor. 보공, Chin. 補空, lit. filling gaps). The number of clothing items used varies according to the social status of the deceased. The reason for filling the gaps is to protect the body by preventing it from moving inside the coffin and preserve it for a long time by minimizing contact with oxygen. When the body is inside the coffin, the coffin is called yeonggu (Kor. 영구, Chin. 靈柩, casket containing a dead body).

But during Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), Korea’s traditional rituals were simplified in the name of modernization, including yeomseup (Kor. 염습, Chin. 殮襲, lit. bathing and shrouding). Today all three procedures are performed within 24 hours, not over three days.

Lit. bathing and shrouding

Lit. bathing and shrouding
Headword

염습 ( 殮襲 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Bathing the body of a deceased person, dressing it in su-ui (Kor. 수의, Chin. 襚衣, lit. burial garments), and shrouding it to enclose it in a coffin. It consists of three procedures: seup (bathing and dressing the body of the deceased), soryeom (shrouding the body of the deceased in a cloth), and daeryeom (shrouding the body of the deceased in a cloth one more time and placing it in the coffin).

Seup is bathing the body of the deceased and dressing it in su-ui on the day of death.

Soryeom is shrouding the body in a cloth on the second day of death. The cloth should be in two layers, and old clothes of the deceased are used to stuff any gaps to protect the body. Straps are needed to tie the wrapped body— three straps for horizontal tying and one strap for vertical tying. The ends of the straps are cut into three pieces to make tying easy. The horizontal straps should be long enough to wrap around the body and the vertical strap to wrap the head and feet and tie it at the navel.

After bathing and dressing the body of the deceased, it is moved on to a piece of prepared cloth. A silk-lined garment is rolled up and placed under the head instead of a pillow, and the two ends of the silk garment are rolled up to fill the gaps above the shoulders. Other old clothes are used to fill the gaps between the legs and beside the legs, and to cover the body. The body is then wrapped in the cloth on which it is placed, the feet first, then the head, then the left side and right side. The body is wrapped with the straps, vertically first and then horizontally, with the ends tucked in rather than knotted. Lastly the body is covered with a cloth.

Daeryeom is shrouding the body of the deceased one more time and placing it in the coffin. It is done on the third day after death to give time for the deceased to come back to life. After the body is placed in the coffin, the empty spaces are filled with old clothes of the deceased, a practice called bogong (Kor. 보공, Chin. 補空, lit. filling gaps). The number of clothing items used varies according to the social status of the deceased. The reason for filling the gaps is to protect the body by preventing it from moving inside the coffin and preserve it for a long time by minimizing contact with oxygen. When the body is inside the coffin, the coffin is called yeonggu (Kor. 영구, Chin. 靈柩, casket containing a dead body).

But during Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), Korea’s traditional rituals were simplified in the name of modernization, including yeomseup (Kor. 염습, Chin. 殮襲, lit. bathing and shrouding). Today all three procedures are performed within 24 hours, not over three days.