Cylinder-shaped Rice Cake(长条年糕)

Cylinder-shaped Rice Cake

Headword

가래떡 ( 长条年糕 , Garaetteok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimSangbo(金尙寶)

Garaetteok refers to a type of rice cake made by pounding rice dough and shaping it into long thin cylinders. Sliced garaetteok is the main ingredient in the special New Year food called tteokguk (Kor. 떡국, lit. rice cake soup). According to the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor, 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849), the cylinder-shaped rice cake was also called baekbyeong (Kor. 백병, Chin. 白餠, lit. white rice cake), and the soup made with its slices was an essential part of the New Year’s festive foods.

During the New Year celebrations Koreans ate soup with garaetteok both on New Year’s Eve and on New Year’s Day. Before cooking the soup on New Year’s Eve, the two main ingredients, rice cake and beef, were offered to sesin (Kor. 세신, Chin. 歲神, god of longevity and good harvest). All members of the family ate it together in the hope of receiving happiness in the new year. On New Year’s Day, the soup was an important offering at the ancestral memorial ceremonies. It then was served to all those gathered for the ceremonies and the New Year greetings.

The royal court of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1910) held an annual sacrificial rite on New Year’s Eve to thank all the guardian spirits for any blessings received and to pray for an auspicious spring. The long, cylinder-shaped rice cake was offered to the gods and this event and shared among the participants because it symbolized longevity and the positive energy yang (Kor. 양, Chin. 陽).

Cylinder-shaped Rice Cake

Cylinder-shaped Rice Cake
Headword

가래떡 ( 长条年糕 , Garaetteok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimSangbo(金尙寶)

Garaetteok refers to a type of rice cake made by pounding rice dough and shaping it into long thin cylinders. Sliced garaetteok is the main ingredient in the special New Year food called tteokguk (Kor. 떡국, lit. rice cake soup). According to the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor, 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849), the cylinder-shaped rice cake was also called baekbyeong (Kor. 백병, Chin. 白餠, lit. white rice cake), and the soup made with its slices was an essential part of the New Year’s festive foods.

During the New Year celebrations Koreans ate soup with garaetteok both on New Year’s Eve and on New Year’s Day. Before cooking the soup on New Year’s Eve, the two main ingredients, rice cake and beef, were offered to sesin (Kor. 세신, Chin. 歲神, god of longevity and good harvest). All members of the family ate it together in the hope of receiving happiness in the new year. On New Year’s Day, the soup was an important offering at the ancestral memorial ceremonies. It then was served to all those gathered for the ceremonies and the New Year greetings.

The royal court of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1910) held an annual sacrificial rite on New Year’s Eve to thank all the guardian spirits for any blessings received and to pray for an auspicious spring. The long, cylinder-shaped rice cake was offered to the gods and this event and shared among the participants because it symbolized longevity and the positive energy yang (Kor. 양, Chin. 陽).