Yellow Soil(黄土)

Yellow Soil

Headword

황토 ( 黄土 , Hwangto )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Props

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

Hwangto, which literally means “yellow soil, ” refers to red clay that is sprinkled at sacred venues related to rituals to purify and to keep out bad fortune.

Also called geumto (taboo soil), the clay is dug from a location in the village considered clean and free of impurities. The color red is believed to possess ghost-repelling powers and red clay ensures sanctity in carrying out a ritual by keeping out bad forces. It is sprinkled at the ritual venue and other venues occupied by ritual officials and those preparing the sacrificial foods, or in places believed to be susceptible to the intrusion of evil spirits; around the village guardian tree; the well that provides water for preparing sacrifices; outside the homes of ritual officials and others participating in ritual preparations; and where the taboo rope (geumjul) is hung at the village entrance.

Hwangto is sprinkled evenly, about half a shovel for each step taken.

Yellow Soil

Yellow Soil
Headword

황토 ( 黄土 , Hwangto )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Props

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

Hwangto, which literally means “yellow soil, ” refers to red clay that is sprinkled at sacred venues related to rituals to purify and to keep out bad fortune.

Also called geumto (taboo soil), the clay is dug from a location in the village considered clean and free of impurities. The color red is believed to possess ghost-repelling powers and red clay ensures sanctity in carrying out a ritual by keeping out bad forces. It is sprinkled at the ritual venue and other venues occupied by ritual officials and those preparing the sacrificial foods, or in places believed to be susceptible to the intrusion of evil spirits; around the village guardian tree; the well that provides water for preparing sacrifices; outside the homes of ritual officials and others participating in ritual preparations; and where the taboo rope (geumjul) is hung at the village entrance.

Hwangto is sprinkled evenly, about half a shovel for each step taken.