Red Bean Porridge(红豆粥)

Red Bean Porridge

Headword

팥죽 ( 红豆粥 , Patjuk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Ritual Offerings

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Patjuk, or red bean porridge, is a dish served on Dongji (Winter Solstice), and also offered as a sacrificial food or sprinkled in an act of sorcery to keep out bad fortune.

Patjuk is cooked by boiling red beans in water, after which the beans are crushed, then strained. Rice is added to the water to make porridge.

The practice of eating red bean porridge dates back to late Goryeo (918-1392), when the Chinese book Jinchu suishiji (Festivals and Seasonal Customs of the Jing-Chu Region) was introduced. Red was traditionally believed as a color that chases away evil, which gave red beans the same power. The section on red bean porridge in Jinchu suishiji goes as follows: “The legendary figure Gonggongshi had a son who was a fool, and he died on winter solstice and became the ghost of smallpox. He was afraid of red beans, so on winter solstice red bean porridge was cooked to keep him away.”

By late Joseon, it had become widespread practice to offer red bean porridge as sacrificial food at shrines and at various corners of the house where household gods reside. Sometimes the porridge was sprinkled on the gate of the house, or even inside the house for the household gods. In Gyeonggi Province, a ritual was observed at the shrine offering red bean porridge, then bowls of the porridge were offered to the household gods in the rooms, in the open hall, and on the sauce jar terrace, and the entire family sat down together for a meal of porridge. In Gyeongsang Provinces on winter solstice, red bean porridge was sprinkled in the yard and on the walls of the house using pine branches. The porridge was also sprinkled on the big old tree in the entrance of the village to keep out evil spirits and ghosts.

Red Bean Porridge

Red Bean Porridge
Headword

팥죽 ( 红豆粥 , Patjuk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Ritual Offerings

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Patjuk, or red bean porridge, is a dish served on Dongji (Winter Solstice), and also offered as a sacrificial food or sprinkled in an act of sorcery to keep out bad fortune.

Patjuk is cooked by boiling red beans in water, after which the beans are crushed, then strained. Rice is added to the water to make porridge.

The practice of eating red bean porridge dates back to late Goryeo (918-1392), when the Chinese book Jinchu suishiji (Festivals and Seasonal Customs of the Jing-Chu Region) was introduced. Red was traditionally believed as a color that chases away evil, which gave red beans the same power. The section on red bean porridge in Jinchu suishiji goes as follows: “The legendary figure Gonggongshi had a son who was a fool, and he died on winter solstice and became the ghost of smallpox. He was afraid of red beans, so on winter solstice red bean porridge was cooked to keep him away.”

By late Joseon, it had become widespread practice to offer red bean porridge as sacrificial food at shrines and at various corners of the house where household gods reside. Sometimes the porridge was sprinkled on the gate of the house, or even inside the house for the household gods. In Gyeonggi Province, a ritual was observed at the shrine offering red bean porridge, then bowls of the porridge were offered to the household gods in the rooms, in the open hall, and on the sauce jar terrace, and the entire family sat down together for a meal of porridge. In Gyeongsang Provinces on winter solstice, red bean porridge was sprinkled in the yard and on the walls of the house using pine branches. The porridge was also sprinkled on the big old tree in the entrance of the village to keep out evil spirits and ghosts.