Sea God Shrine(海神祠)

Sea God Shrine

Headword

제주해신사 ( 海神祠 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KangJungsik(姜晶植)

Haesinsa is a shrine for praying to the god of the seas for a good harvest, big catch, peace in the village and safety for the boats.

Sea god shrines stand on the three coasts of the Korean peninsula, which used to serve as venues for state-organized rituals each year in the second and eighth lunar months, with incense and prayer messages sent by the king: Donghaesinmyo (Shrine for the East Sea God) in Yangyang, Gangwon Province; Seohaesinsa (Shrine for the West Sea God) in Pungcheon, Hwanghae Province; and Namhaesinsa (Shrine for the South Sea God) in Yeongam, South Jeolla Province.

The Shrine for the East Sea God in Yangyang is believed to have been built in Goryeo (918-1392) and was designated as a state ritual venue in early Joseon (1392-1910). The shrine was closed down during the Japanese occupation in the first half of the 20th century then was rebuilt in 1993 when the government bought back the land for the shrine’s restoration.

The Shrine for the South Sea God had served as a venue for both state and civilian rituals since Goryeo but was closed down under Japanese occupation. The shrine was recently restored and rituals are observed each spring and fall. The deity worshipped as South Sea God is Yongsin (Dragon God) and it is believed that the dragon emerged from the sea during rituals and entered Namhae Port.

On Jeju Island, the Sea God Shrine was first built in the 20th year of King Sunjo’s reign (1820) in Joseon, in Hwabuk, a major port that connected the island with the mainland, for the purpose of praying for the safety of boats sailing the rough sea. Rituals were held prior to the departure of each boat, and a large-scale annual rite was observed on Jeongwoldaeboreum (Great Full Moon) in the first lunar month.

Sea God Shrine

Sea God Shrine
Headword

제주해신사 ( 海神祠 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KangJungsik(姜晶植)

Haesinsa is a shrine for praying to the god of the seas for a good harvest, big catch, peace in the village and safety for the boats.

Sea god shrines stand on the three coasts of the Korean peninsula, which used to serve as venues for state-organized rituals each year in the second and eighth lunar months, with incense and prayer messages sent by the king: Donghaesinmyo (Shrine for the East Sea God) in Yangyang, Gangwon Province; Seohaesinsa (Shrine for the West Sea God) in Pungcheon, Hwanghae Province; and Namhaesinsa (Shrine for the South Sea God) in Yeongam, South Jeolla Province.

The Shrine for the East Sea God in Yangyang is believed to have been built in Goryeo (918-1392) and was designated as a state ritual venue in early Joseon (1392-1910). The shrine was closed down during the Japanese occupation in the first half of the 20th century then was rebuilt in 1993 when the government bought back the land for the shrine’s restoration.

The Shrine for the South Sea God had served as a venue for both state and civilian rituals since Goryeo but was closed down under Japanese occupation. The shrine was recently restored and rituals are observed each spring and fall. The deity worshipped as South Sea God is Yongsin (Dragon God) and it is believed that the dragon emerged from the sea during rituals and entered Namhae Port.

On Jeju Island, the Sea God Shrine was first built in the 20th year of King Sunjo’s reign (1820) in Joseon, in Hwabuk, a major port that connected the island with the mainland, for the purpose of praying for the safety of boats sailing the rough sea. Rituals were held prior to the departure of each boat, and a large-scale annual rite was observed on Jeongwoldaeboreum (Great Full Moon) in the first lunar month.