Shrine for General Choe Yeong(崔瑩將軍祠堂)

Shrine for General Choe Yeong

Headword

제주최영장군사당 ( 崔瑩將軍祠堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KangJungsik(姜晶植)

This is a shrine is dedicated to General Choe Yeong (1316-1388), a commander and loyal subject of late Goryeo (918-1392).

General Choe Yeong was revered for military distinction including his defense of the kingdom against Japanese invasion. He was however defeated by mutiny leader Yi Seong-gye, who went on to found Joseon (1392-1910) and beheaded. Because he met a tragic death while trying to defend the declining Goryeo, Choe came to be deified and worshipped as a shamanic god.

Shrines dedicated to General Choe Yeong remain today in several locations, including Mt. Deongmul in Gaeseong; in Tongyeong, South Gyeongsang Province; and on Chuja Island in Jeju.

The General Choe Yeong Shrine on Mt. Deongmul in Gaeseong, Hwanghae Province, was considered the most sacred site among shamans of the central regions. In Joseon, a shaman was assigned to this shrine to exclusively worship the spirit of General Choe Yeong and the state collected taxes from the shrine to finance government projects. On the summit of Mt. Deongmul, there was a village for shamans named Sansangdong, a community that lasted until the Japanese occupation. The village was home to a shrine for General Choe Yeong called Janggundang (General’s Shrine); Buindang, where Choe’s wife was enshrined; and Changbudang, a shrine for the Clown God, where each deity was enshrined in the form of clay figurines or paintings.

The southern coast is also home to a number of shrines for General Choe Yeong, since this was where the commander fought off the invading Japanese. The shrine in Tongyeong is also called Janggundang and enshrined inside are a portrait of the general and a spirit tablet. Rituals are observed on the fourteenth day of the first and last lunar months of the year.

The General Choe Yeong Shrine in Jeju is believed to have been built in late Goryeo. In the 23rd year of King Gongmin’s reign (1374), the general was on a boat headed to Jeju Island where a rebellion had erupted but a sea storm forced him to seek shelter on Chuja Island, where he stayed for a period of time and taught the villagers to use fishing nets. Legends say that the villagers built the shrine in his honor after he left, and rituals have been observed each year on the fifteenth day of the seventh lunar month and on the last day of the lunar calendar to pray for a good harvest and big catch.

Shrine for General Choe Yeong

Shrine for General Choe Yeong
Headword

제주최영장군사당 ( 崔瑩將軍祠堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KangJungsik(姜晶植)

This is a shrine is dedicated to General Choe Yeong (1316-1388), a commander and loyal subject of late Goryeo (918-1392).

General Choe Yeong was revered for military distinction including his defense of the kingdom against Japanese invasion. He was however defeated by mutiny leader Yi Seong-gye, who went on to found Joseon (1392-1910) and beheaded. Because he met a tragic death while trying to defend the declining Goryeo, Choe came to be deified and worshipped as a shamanic god.

Shrines dedicated to General Choe Yeong remain today in several locations, including Mt. Deongmul in Gaeseong; in Tongyeong, South Gyeongsang Province; and on Chuja Island in Jeju.

The General Choe Yeong Shrine on Mt. Deongmul in Gaeseong, Hwanghae Province, was considered the most sacred site among shamans of the central regions. In Joseon, a shaman was assigned to this shrine to exclusively worship the spirit of General Choe Yeong and the state collected taxes from the shrine to finance government projects. On the summit of Mt. Deongmul, there was a village for shamans named Sansangdong, a community that lasted until the Japanese occupation. The village was home to a shrine for General Choe Yeong called Janggundang (General’s Shrine); Buindang, where Choe’s wife was enshrined; and Changbudang, a shrine for the Clown God, where each deity was enshrined in the form of clay figurines or paintings.

The southern coast is also home to a number of shrines for General Choe Yeong, since this was where the commander fought off the invading Japanese. The shrine in Tongyeong is also called Janggundang and enshrined inside are a portrait of the general and a spirit tablet. Rituals are observed on the fourteenth day of the first and last lunar months of the year.

The General Choe Yeong Shrine in Jeju is believed to have been built in late Goryeo. In the 23rd year of King Gongmin’s reign (1374), the general was on a boat headed to Jeju Island where a rebellion had erupted but a sea storm forced him to seek shelter on Chuja Island, where he stayed for a period of time and taught the villagers to use fishing nets. Legends say that the villagers built the shrine in his honor after he left, and rituals have been observed each year on the fifteenth day of the seventh lunar month and on the last day of the lunar calendar to pray for a good harvest and big catch.