Song of the Origin of Jeseok(帝释本解)

Song of the Origin of Jeseok

Headword

제석본풀이 ( 帝释本解 , Jeseokbonpuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

“Jeseokbonpuri, ” or the “Song of the Origin of Jeseok, Godess of Childbirth, ” is a shamanic song performed as part of rituals.

This epic is also referred to as “Samtaejapuri (Song of the Triplets), ” “Danggeumaegi (Song of Maiden Danggeum)” and “Chogongbonpuri (Song of the Origin of Shaman Ancestor Goddess).” “Jeseokbonpuri” is one of Korea’s three major shamanic epics along with “Seongjupuri (Song of House Guardian God), ” performed as part of the ritual for household guardian god Seongju, and “Barigongju (Song of Abandoned Princess Bari), ” performed as part of the underworld entry ritual ogugut. It is also the most widespread among the three.

There are myriad versions of “Jeseokbonpuri” so the plot varies but can be summarized as follows:

The heroine is home alone while her parents and brothers are away, when a monk from the mountain comes and requests a donation. In the story, the donation is accompanied by an act suggestive of sexual intercourse related to conception, or the monk spends the night at the house and the two engage in intimacy. The heroine’s ensuing pregnancy results in her banishment or incarceration by her family. When she gives birth to triplets, she sets out to find the monk and settles down with him or is deified as Samsin, the goddess of childbearing, and the triplets as Jeseok, the god of childbirth.

“Jeseokbonpuri” as a nationally recognized epic can be seen as Buddhist worship modified as a form of folk belief –in other words, a phenomenon of cultural assimilation. The name Jeseok originated from Buddhism, based on the Chinese transcription of Indra (Sakra), and the shamanic garb for performing this song in the South Jeolla Province is clearly related to the costume of a Buddhist monk, including a white conical hat folded from paper, and a simplified version of the monk’s jacket, with a red band across the shoulders. This signifies that Jeseok, a deity borrowed from Buddhism, has been developed over time into an influential presence in Korean folk religion, its influence prevalent across the cultue, from foundation myths to the worship of household gods.

Song of the Origin of Jeseok

Song of the Origin of Jeseok
Headword

제석본풀이 ( 帝释本解 , Jeseokbonpuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

“Jeseokbonpuri, ” or the “Song of the Origin of Jeseok, Godess of Childbirth, ” is a shamanic song performed as part of rituals.

This epic is also referred to as “Samtaejapuri (Song of the Triplets), ” “Danggeumaegi (Song of Maiden Danggeum)” and “Chogongbonpuri (Song of the Origin of Shaman Ancestor Goddess).” “Jeseokbonpuri” is one of Korea’s three major shamanic epics along with “Seongjupuri (Song of House Guardian God), ” performed as part of the ritual for household guardian god Seongju, and “Barigongju (Song of Abandoned Princess Bari), ” performed as part of the underworld entry ritual ogugut. It is also the most widespread among the three.

There are myriad versions of “Jeseokbonpuri” so the plot varies but can be summarized as follows:

The heroine is home alone while her parents and brothers are away, when a monk from the mountain comes and requests a donation. In the story, the donation is accompanied by an act suggestive of sexual intercourse related to conception, or the monk spends the night at the house and the two engage in intimacy. The heroine’s ensuing pregnancy results in her banishment or incarceration by her family. When she gives birth to triplets, she sets out to find the monk and settles down with him or is deified as Samsin, the goddess of childbearing, and the triplets as Jeseok, the god of childbirth.

“Jeseokbonpuri” as a nationally recognized epic can be seen as Buddhist worship modified as a form of folk belief –in other words, a phenomenon of cultural assimilation. The name Jeseok originated from Buddhism, based on the Chinese transcription of Indra (Sakra), and the shamanic garb for performing this song in the South Jeolla Province is clearly related to the costume of a Buddhist monk, including a white conical hat folded from paper, and a simplified version of the monk’s jacket, with a red band across the shoulders. This signifies that Jeseok, a deity borrowed from Buddhism, has been developed over time into an influential presence in Korean folk religion, its influence prevalent across the cultue, from foundation myths to the worship of household gods.