Shamanic Ritual for Good Fortune(利市巫祭)

Shamanic Ritual for Good Fortune

Headword

재수굿 ( 利市巫祭 , Jaesugut )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Rites and Officiants

Writer LeeKwanho(李官浩)

Jaesugut is a shamanic ritual held to pray for good fortune in the family including peace, prosperity and longevity.

Jaesugut is the most basic ritual in Korean shamanism, and is also called cheonsingut, or new offerings ritual, held to offer the season’s new products to the gods. The format of this ritual served as the foundation on which myriad other rituals were developed by adding specific elements and characteristics.

The goals of a good fortune ritual lie in the wellbeing of the living, as opposed to those of jinogigut, or underworld entry ritual, held to lead the soul of the deceased to the other world. Jaesugut is held annually or every two or three years, or in times of trouble in the family, usually in the first lunar month or in spring and fall, on an auspicious day selected according to saenggibokdeok, the family’s predicted fortunes for a given day. The ritual is officiated by a shaman, accompanied by two or three musicians. In the past, rituals would start in the morning and continue through the night until morning, but nowadays they end by evening. Jaesugut is in nature a festive ritual, staged like a celebration in an affluent home, with relatives and neighbors invited as guests. It aims at preserving the family’s good fortunes and prosperity by generously extending their hospitality to the gods and to humans.

Shamanic Ritual for Good Fortune

Shamanic Ritual for Good Fortune
Headword

재수굿 ( 利市巫祭 , Jaesugut )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Rites and Officiants

Writer LeeKwanho(李官浩)

Jaesugut is a shamanic ritual held to pray for good fortune in the family including peace, prosperity and longevity.

Jaesugut is the most basic ritual in Korean shamanism, and is also called cheonsingut, or new offerings ritual, held to offer the season’s new products to the gods. The format of this ritual served as the foundation on which myriad other rituals were developed by adding specific elements and characteristics.

The goals of a good fortune ritual lie in the wellbeing of the living, as opposed to those of jinogigut, or underworld entry ritual, held to lead the soul of the deceased to the other world. Jaesugut is held annually or every two or three years, or in times of trouble in the family, usually in the first lunar month or in spring and fall, on an auspicious day selected according to saenggibokdeok, the family’s predicted fortunes for a given day. The ritual is officiated by a shaman, accompanied by two or three musicians. In the past, rituals would start in the morning and continue through the night until morning, but nowadays they end by evening. Jaesugut is in nature a festive ritual, staged like a celebration in an affluent home, with relatives and neighbors invited as guests. It aims at preserving the family’s good fortunes and prosperity by generously extending their hospitality to the gods and to humans.