Consumption of Sacrificial Food(饮福)

Consumption of Sacrificial Food

Headword

음복 ( 饮福 , Eumbok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Concept

Writer HongTaehan(洪泰漢)

Eumbok, literally meaning, “to drink good fortune, ” refers to the practice by ritual participants of sharing sacrificial foods during or after the ritual to pray for good fortune.

All rituals aim at communicating the wishes of humans to the deities in hopes of achieving them, for which a variety of sacrificial foods are prepared as an expression of human longing and devotion.

A set of designated foods are offered according to formal procedures, during which the worshipped god’s response and intent are communicated repeatedly, through the shaman’s channeling (gongsu) or through the movements and actions of the ritual officiant. At times the officiant takes pieces of the sacrificial food from the table and hands them out to these attending as food sent by the gods, which is also referred to as eumbok.

Consuming food from the ritual table signifies that the gods and humans are unified through food, that the gods’ intents have been delivered to the people and that the people will be able to achieve their wishes. Once the sacrificial foods are arranged on the ritual table, they transform into sacred entities, and their consumption signifies not only a communal sharing of food but also contact between humans and the higher spirits.

Consumption of Sacrificial Food

Consumption of Sacrificial Food
Headword

음복 ( 饮福 , Eumbok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Concept

Writer HongTaehan(洪泰漢)

Eumbok, literally meaning, “to drink good fortune, ” refers to the practice by ritual participants of sharing sacrificial foods during or after the ritual to pray for good fortune.

All rituals aim at communicating the wishes of humans to the deities in hopes of achieving them, for which a variety of sacrificial foods are prepared as an expression of human longing and devotion.

A set of designated foods are offered according to formal procedures, during which the worshipped god’s response and intent are communicated repeatedly, through the shaman’s channeling (gongsu) or through the movements and actions of the ritual officiant. At times the officiant takes pieces of the sacrificial food from the table and hands them out to these attending as food sent by the gods, which is also referred to as eumbok.

Consuming food from the ritual table signifies that the gods and humans are unified through food, that the gods’ intents have been delivered to the people and that the people will be able to achieve their wishes. Once the sacrificial foods are arranged on the ritual table, they transform into sacred entities, and their consumption signifies not only a communal sharing of food but also contact between humans and the higher spirits.