Five Rites in The Annals of King Sejong(世宗實錄 五禮)

Five Rites in The Annals of King Sejong

Headword

세종실록 오례 ( 世宗實錄 五禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Reference

Writer KoYoungjin(高英津)

The first comprehensive book on the five state rites of the early Joseon period (1392-1910).

Fascicles 1-127 of ”Sejongsillok” (The Annals of King Sejong) were compiled in chronological order, and, along with the annals of other Joseon kings they have been collectively designated as a National Treasure for protection by the government. Appendices to “The Annals of King Sejong” include “Orye” (Kor. 오례, Chin. 五禮, five rites); “Akbo” (Kor. 악보, Chin. 樂譜, musical scores); “Jiriji” (Kor. 지리지, Chin. 地理志, book of geography); and “Chiljeongsan” (Kor. 칠정산, Chin. 七政算, calculations of the seven luminaries). Of them, the five state rites, originating from “Jurye” (周禮), refer to gillye (Kor. 길례, Chin. 吉禮, memorial rites), hyungnye (Kor. 흉례, Chin. 凶禮, rites for mournful events), billye (Kor. 빈례, Chin. 賓禮, diplomatic rites), ·gullye (Kor. 군례, Chin. 軍禮, military rites), and·garye (Kor. 가례, Chin. 嘉禮, rites for royal events including weddings). The five-rite system was actively adopted in the Joseon period. During King Taejong’s reign (r. 1400-1418), Uirye sangjeongso, or Office for the Establishment of Ceremonies, was created to carry out intensive research on the ritual system. Full-fledged research on ancient systems was conducted by the newly established institute Jiphyeonjeon, or the Hall of Worthies, under the reign of King Sejong (r. 1418-1450). The five state rites came to be better organized and were recorded in “Orye, ” one of the appendices to “The Annals of King Sejong.” The compilation signifies the first complete organization of the state rites as well as the establishment of central power and state rule according to the system of rites. Besides the rites of state and the royal court, the book also deals with rites associated with the local communities, the ruling class, and the commoners but to a very limited extent.

Five Rites in The Annals of King Sejong

Five Rites in The Annals of King Sejong
Headword

세종실록 오례 ( 世宗實錄 五禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Reference

Writer KoYoungjin(高英津)

The first comprehensive book on the five state rites of the early Joseon period (1392-1910).

Fascicles 1-127 of ”Sejongsillok” (The Annals of King Sejong) were compiled in chronological order, and, along with the annals of other Joseon kings they have been collectively designated as a National Treasure for protection by the government. Appendices to “The Annals of King Sejong” include “Orye” (Kor. 오례, Chin. 五禮, five rites); “Akbo” (Kor. 악보, Chin. 樂譜, musical scores); “Jiriji” (Kor. 지리지, Chin. 地理志, book of geography); and “Chiljeongsan” (Kor. 칠정산, Chin. 七政算, calculations of the seven luminaries). Of them, the five state rites, originating from “Jurye” (周禮), refer to gillye (Kor. 길례, Chin. 吉禮, memorial rites), hyungnye (Kor. 흉례, Chin. 凶禮, rites for mournful events), billye (Kor. 빈례, Chin. 賓禮, diplomatic rites), ·gullye (Kor. 군례, Chin. 軍禮, military rites), and·garye (Kor. 가례, Chin. 嘉禮, rites for royal events including weddings). The five-rite system was actively adopted in the Joseon period. During King Taejong’s reign (r. 1400-1418), Uirye sangjeongso, or Office for the Establishment of Ceremonies, was created to carry out intensive research on the ritual system. Full-fledged research on ancient systems was conducted by the newly established institute Jiphyeonjeon, or the Hall of Worthies, under the reign of King Sejong (r. 1418-1450). The five state rites came to be better organized and were recorded in “Orye, ” one of the appendices to “The Annals of King Sejong.” The compilation signifies the first complete organization of the state rites as well as the establishment of central power and state rule according to the system of rites. Besides the rites of state and the royal court, the book also deals with rites associated with the local communities, the ruling class, and the commoners but to a very limited extent.