Sacred District Sodo(蘇塗)

Headword

소도 ( 蘇塗 , Sodo )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer SeoYoungdae(徐永大)

Sodo was a sacred district in Mahan, one of the Three Han States of ancient Korea, circa 1st–3rd centuries.

Details about Sodo can be found in the Chinese history book Sanguozhi (Records of the Three Kingdoms), in the “Account of Dongyi” chapter of the volume History of the Wei Dynasty. The book describes a district called Sodo in the Three Han States that was independent of the boundaries of political administration, where spirits were worshipped through rituals using a pole attached with a rattle and drum. The district was sacred, and refugees fled there for protection, which resulted in widespread burglary, the book records. The Three Han States were small political entities based on metal culture that had formed in the southern parts of the Korean peninsula.

The pole is viewed as the channel for the descent of an agricultural god to the venue of the ritual, and the rattle and drum used to signal to the god the directions to the site. Sodo was, in effect, an asylum of sorts, a sacred place unreached by secular authority.

Sacred District Sodo

Sacred District Sodo
Headword

소도 ( 蘇塗 , Sodo )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer SeoYoungdae(徐永大)

Sodo was a sacred district in Mahan, one of the Three Han States of ancient Korea, circa 1st–3rd centuries.

Details about Sodo can be found in the Chinese history book Sanguozhi (Records of the Three Kingdoms), in the “Account of Dongyi” chapter of the volume History of the Wei Dynasty. The book describes a district called Sodo in the Three Han States that was independent of the boundaries of political administration, where spirits were worshipped through rituals using a pole attached with a rattle and drum. The district was sacred, and refugees fled there for protection, which resulted in widespread burglary, the book records. The Three Han States were small political entities based on metal culture that had formed in the southern parts of the Korean peninsula.

The pole is viewed as the channel for the descent of an agricultural god to the venue of the ritual, and the rattle and drum used to signal to the god the directions to the site. Sodo was, in effect, an asylum of sorts, a sacred place unreached by secular authority.