Song of House Guardian God(城主解)

Song of House Guardian God

Headword

성주풀이 ( 城主解 , Seongjupuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer ChoHyunseol(趙顯卨)

“Seongjupuri” is a shamanic myth or epic song that chronicles the history of house guardian god Seongju and his wife Jisin the land goddess.

The song is performed or recited as part of shamanic rituals held for Seongju upon moving into a new home or to mark the completion of a newly constructed house. This narrative has been preserved in two different versions: The Hwanguyang type from the northern parts of Gyeonggi Province and the Ansimguk type from the Busan area. Both tell the story of the genesis of the deity Seongju through the union between heaven and earth, but they differ greatly in detail.

The Hwanguyang type begins with the birth of Hwanguyang between Cheondaemoksin of the Palace Under Heaven and Lady Jital of the Palace Underground. The baby grew up and married, and one day a sudden east wind blew, battering the Palace Under Heaven into decline, and the palace’s guardian deity Seongju disappeared as well. The person summoned to solve this problem was Hwanguyang, who was living at the foot of Mt. Hwangsan in the Palace Underground. Since he did not have carpentry tools, his wife had them made for him, using metal she had received from the Palace Under Heaven. Seeing him off, she instructs him never to talk back to anyone on his way to the palace. But Hwanguyang falls for Sojinnang’s scheme and while engaged in a conversation, agrees to switch clothes with him. While Hwanguyang continues to travel to the Palace Under Heaven, Sojinnang heads to the Palace Underground in Hwanguyang’s clothes and attempts to take his place as husband, but Hwanguyang’s wife manages to keep him out by outwitting him. Hwanguyang learns of this situation in his dream and rushes back home upon completing his work. He finds a note that his wife has written in blood and finds out what has been happening, and transforms into a bird to hide under his wife’s skirt and succeeds in capturing Sojinnang. He locks the captive in a stone box and gives him the title of Seonang (Village Guardian Deity). Upon hearing that his wife has acquired the skill of breeding silkworms and spinning silk, he gives her the title of Jisin, the land goddess, and himself takes on the title of house guardian god Seongju.

In the Ansimguk type of the “Seongjupuri” narrative, the husband’s name is Ansimguk, also known as Seongjossi. When he learns that there is no house for him in the Palace Underground, he plants pine nuts for lumber. He falls into debauchery, however, which sends him into exile and upon his return to the Palace Underground, cuts down the pine trees and builds his house. Upon completion of the house, he takes on the title of Seongju.

“Seongjupuri” myth is fundamentally a narrative about husband and wife, the foundation of family, which is closely related to its function as a song performed in shamanic rituals for worshipping the house guardian god of a new home. By telling the story of a husband and wife that overcome trials and become a house guardian deity and a land goddess, this myth gives significance to rituals that pray for the fortunes of a family.

Song of House Guardian God

Song of House Guardian God
Headword

성주풀이 ( 城主解 , Seongjupuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer ChoHyunseol(趙顯卨)

“Seongjupuri” is a shamanic myth or epic song that chronicles the history of house guardian god Seongju and his wife Jisin the land goddess.

The song is performed or recited as part of shamanic rituals held for Seongju upon moving into a new home or to mark the completion of a newly constructed house. This narrative has been preserved in two different versions: The Hwanguyang type from the northern parts of Gyeonggi Province and the Ansimguk type from the Busan area. Both tell the story of the genesis of the deity Seongju through the union between heaven and earth, but they differ greatly in detail.

The Hwanguyang type begins with the birth of Hwanguyang between Cheondaemoksin of the Palace Under Heaven and Lady Jital of the Palace Underground. The baby grew up and married, and one day a sudden east wind blew, battering the Palace Under Heaven into decline, and the palace’s guardian deity Seongju disappeared as well. The person summoned to solve this problem was Hwanguyang, who was living at the foot of Mt. Hwangsan in the Palace Underground. Since he did not have carpentry tools, his wife had them made for him, using metal she had received from the Palace Under Heaven. Seeing him off, she instructs him never to talk back to anyone on his way to the palace. But Hwanguyang falls for Sojinnang’s scheme and while engaged in a conversation, agrees to switch clothes with him. While Hwanguyang continues to travel to the Palace Under Heaven, Sojinnang heads to the Palace Underground in Hwanguyang’s clothes and attempts to take his place as husband, but Hwanguyang’s wife manages to keep him out by outwitting him. Hwanguyang learns of this situation in his dream and rushes back home upon completing his work. He finds a note that his wife has written in blood and finds out what has been happening, and transforms into a bird to hide under his wife’s skirt and succeeds in capturing Sojinnang. He locks the captive in a stone box and gives him the title of Seonang (Village Guardian Deity). Upon hearing that his wife has acquired the skill of breeding silkworms and spinning silk, he gives her the title of Jisin, the land goddess, and himself takes on the title of house guardian god Seongju.

In the Ansimguk type of the “Seongjupuri” narrative, the husband’s name is Ansimguk, also known as Seongjossi. When he learns that there is no house for him in the Palace Underground, he plants pine nuts for lumber. He falls into debauchery, however, which sends him into exile and upon his return to the Palace Underground, cuts down the pine trees and builds his house. Upon completion of the house, he takes on the title of Seongju.

“Seongjupuri” myth is fundamentally a narrative about husband and wife, the foundation of family, which is closely related to its function as a song performed in shamanic rituals for worshipping the house guardian god of a new home. By telling the story of a husband and wife that overcome trials and become a house guardian deity and a land goddess, this myth gives significance to rituals that pray for the fortunes of a family.