Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home(釋奠·祈雨·安宅)

Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home

Headword

석전·기우·안택 ( 釋奠·祈雨·安宅 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > References

Writer NamGeunwoo(南根祐)

“Seokjeon Giu Antaek (Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home)” was the second report issued during the Japanese occupation of Joseon by the Japanese Government-General as part of the publication Chōsen no kyōdo shinshi (Folk Religious Worship in Joseon).

In the late 1930s the Japanese Government- General carried out a detailed survey of the folk religious practices of Korea in each of the provinces and counties and the final publication issued in March 30, 1938, included all the reports from around the country from May 1936.

The Japanese ethnographer Murayama Chijun was commissioned to compile the report, which is a comprehensive investigation of the religious attitudes of the Joseon people, executed as part of the Japanese Government-General’s shinden (“spiritual field”) development policy of the 1930s.

The report comprises two sections and eleven chapters. The six chapters of the first section deals with communal rituals, including the Confucius worship ritual seokjeon and rain rites, while the next seven chapters of the second section are on private rituals. The communal rituals in the first section are divided into rituals held at Munmyo, the National Shrine to Confucius; shrine rituals; rain rites; protection rituals; plague prevention rituals; and market rituals. The private rituals in the second section include the household peace wishing ritual antaek and household gods ritual gosa, along with dragon king rituals (yongwangje); mountain god rituals (sansinje); village deity rituals (seonghwangje); state preceptor rituals (guksaje); bad fortune prevention rituals (jeaekje); and rituals for Seven Stars (chilseongje). A bibliography at the end of the book lists chronologically references on Korean folk beliefs from ancient times through Goryeo and Joseon, including geographies. The survey for the book collected 513 examples of private rituals from 191 counties around the country, which were sorted into 40 types; 20 were household god worship rituals; seven were private rituals held across the country; 13 were miscellaneous private rituals observed only in some parts.

This report was carried out for the purpose of improving the lives in the provincial areas and accelerating the Japanese Government-General’s nai-sen ittai (Japan and Joseon as one entity) policy. The crisis that Japan was facing domestically and internationally at the time of the report and the policies to overcome them became the political background to the purpose and direction of this publication.

Murayama concluded that among the myriad worship rituals, the three in the title best represented the Korean folk ritual: Confucius worship ritual seokjeon as the most formally established; giuje, or rain rites, which served a major function for both the public and the government; and the household peace wishing ritual antaek, which promoted family-oriented life. This publication came to be issued as the second volume of the Chōsen no kyōdo shinshi, following the first, “Burakusai.”

Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home

Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home
Headword

석전·기우·안택 ( 釋奠·祈雨·安宅 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > References

Writer NamGeunwoo(南根祐)

“Seokjeon Giu Antaek (Confucius Worship Rituals; Rain Rites; Rituals for Peace in the Home)” was the second report issued during the Japanese occupation of Joseon by the Japanese Government-General as part of the publication Chōsen no kyōdo shinshi (Folk Religious Worship in Joseon).

In the late 1930s the Japanese Government- General carried out a detailed survey of the folk religious practices of Korea in each of the provinces and counties and the final publication issued in March 30, 1938, included all the reports from around the country from May 1936.

The Japanese ethnographer Murayama Chijun was commissioned to compile the report, which is a comprehensive investigation of the religious attitudes of the Joseon people, executed as part of the Japanese Government-General’s shinden (“spiritual field”) development policy of the 1930s.

The report comprises two sections and eleven chapters. The six chapters of the first section deals with communal rituals, including the Confucius worship ritual seokjeon and rain rites, while the next seven chapters of the second section are on private rituals. The communal rituals in the first section are divided into rituals held at Munmyo, the National Shrine to Confucius; shrine rituals; rain rites; protection rituals; plague prevention rituals; and market rituals. The private rituals in the second section include the household peace wishing ritual antaek and household gods ritual gosa, along with dragon king rituals (yongwangje); mountain god rituals (sansinje); village deity rituals (seonghwangje); state preceptor rituals (guksaje); bad fortune prevention rituals (jeaekje); and rituals for Seven Stars (chilseongje). A bibliography at the end of the book lists chronologically references on Korean folk beliefs from ancient times through Goryeo and Joseon, including geographies. The survey for the book collected 513 examples of private rituals from 191 counties around the country, which were sorted into 40 types; 20 were household god worship rituals; seven were private rituals held across the country; 13 were miscellaneous private rituals observed only in some parts.

This report was carried out for the purpose of improving the lives in the provincial areas and accelerating the Japanese Government-General’s nai-sen ittai (Japan and Joseon as one entity) policy. The crisis that Japan was facing domestically and internationally at the time of the report and the policies to overcome them became the political background to the purpose and direction of this publication.

Murayama concluded that among the myriad worship rituals, the three in the title best represented the Korean folk ritual: Confucius worship ritual seokjeon as the most formally established; giuje, or rain rites, which served a major function for both the public and the government; and the household peace wishing ritual antaek, which promoted family-oriented life. This publication came to be issued as the second volume of the Chōsen no kyōdo shinshi, following the first, “Burakusai.”