Shrine for Village Guardian Deity(守郎堂)

Shrine for Village Guardian Deity

Headword

서낭당 ( 守郎堂 , Seonangdang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

Seonangdang is a term that refers to a shrine for village guardian deity, located at the entrance of the village, on a hillside or hilltop, or the foot of a mountain, in the form of a stone stack altar, some with a tree as well, or in the form of a shrine house.

In some regions seonangdang is called cheonwangdang. Shrines that take the form of a stone stack altar or a tree (dangmok, or village guardian tree), are called guksudang or guksidang.

Today, not many seonangdang in the form of a stone stack altar or tree remain, and most take the form of a small house or hut, sometimes next to an old tree, serving as the guardian deity in the communal faith.

The shrine house, or dangjip, has an altar inside, with a tablet set up in the center. The tablet contains an ink inscription of the Chinese characters “城隍之神 位 (Tablet for Seonghwang Deity).”

While the stone stack seonangdang is more closely associated with private prayers and rituals, the shrine seonangdang is perceived as a venue for communal worship. Seonangdang, in other words, serves as a venue for not only village worship but also the worship of shamanic and household gods.

Shrine for Village Guardian Deity

Shrine for Village Guardian Deity
Headword

서낭당 ( 守郎堂 , Seonangdang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

Seonangdang is a term that refers to a shrine for village guardian deity, located at the entrance of the village, on a hillside or hilltop, or the foot of a mountain, in the form of a stone stack altar, some with a tree as well, or in the form of a shrine house.

In some regions seonangdang is called cheonwangdang. Shrines that take the form of a stone stack altar or a tree (dangmok, or village guardian tree), are called guksudang or guksidang.

Today, not many seonangdang in the form of a stone stack altar or tree remain, and most take the form of a small house or hut, sometimes next to an old tree, serving as the guardian deity in the communal faith.

The shrine house, or dangjip, has an altar inside, with a tablet set up in the center. The tablet contains an ink inscription of the Chinese characters “城隍之神 位 (Tablet for Seonghwang Deity).”

While the stone stack seonangdang is more closely associated with private prayers and rituals, the shrine seonangdang is perceived as a venue for communal worship. Seonangdang, in other words, serves as a venue for not only village worship but also the worship of shamanic and household gods.