Government Office Shrine(府君堂)

Government Office Shrine

Headword

부군당 ( 府君堂 , Bugundang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimTaewoo(金泰佑)

Bugundang referred to shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), and in present times refers to village shrines observed in the Seoul area along the Han River.

These government office shrines were also called bulgeundang (red shrine), bugunmyo (shrine for government office deity), or bugeundang (phallic shrine).

In Joseon, bugundang was housed in tile-roofed buildings that measured one or two kan (1 kan=6.6 m²), located on its own separate grounds fenced with walls, in a corner of the courtyard of the government office building, or in a forest or on a hill nearby. These shrines were constructed as part of the government building in the beginning, but are believed to have been transformed into communal shrines as their government-related functions became obsolete.

Hung inside the shrine was a painting of Bugun (Government Office Deity), portrayed sometimes as a singular individual or as husband and wife. Historical figures and other characters are worshipped as Bugun, including Dangun, founder of ancient kingdom Gojoseon; Yi Seong-gye, founder of Joseon; General Kim Yu-sin of Silla; General Nam Yi of Joseon; General Choe Yeong of Goryeo; General Im Gyeong-eop of Joseon; and Maiden Song.

Government Office Shrine

Government Office Shrine
Headword

부군당 ( 府君堂 , Bugundang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimTaewoo(金泰佑)

Bugundang referred to shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), and in present times refers to village shrines observed in the Seoul area along the Han River.

These government office shrines were also called bulgeundang (red shrine), bugunmyo (shrine for government office deity), or bugeundang (phallic shrine).

In Joseon, bugundang was housed in tile-roofed buildings that measured one or two kan (1 kan=6.6 m²), located on its own separate grounds fenced with walls, in a corner of the courtyard of the government office building, or in a forest or on a hill nearby. These shrines were constructed as part of the government building in the beginning, but are believed to have been transformed into communal shrines as their government-related functions became obsolete.

Hung inside the shrine was a painting of Bugun (Government Office Deity), portrayed sometimes as a singular individual or as husband and wife. Historical figures and other characters are worshipped as Bugun, including Dangun, founder of ancient kingdom Gojoseon; Yi Seong-gye, founder of Joseon; General Kim Yu-sin of Silla; General Nam Yi of Joseon; General Choe Yeong of Goryeo; General Im Gyeong-eop of Joseon; and Maiden Song.