Song of Abandoned Princess Bari(钵里公主)

Song of Abandoned Princess Bari

Headword

바리공주 ( 钵里公主 , Barigongju )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer HongTaehan(洪泰漢)

“Barigongju, ” or “Song of Abandoned Princess Bari, ” is an epic song performed as part of various shamanic rituals including the Malmi (Prayer) Segment of jinogigut, the underworld entry ritual from the Seoul area; the Ogupuri (Song of Ogu) Segment of the grievance cleansing ritual ssitgimgut from South Jeolla Province; and the Balwongut (Prayer Ritual) Segment of the underworld entry ritual ogugut from the eastern coast regions.

Barigongju, or Princess Bari, is the name used in the Seoul area for the heroine of the epic, and is called Baridegi in Jeolla and on the eastern coast. Over ninety versions of the song from around the country have been recorded and archived, offering a comprehensive pool of materials for studying the process of their transmission through history. Details vary by region, but the common plot goes as follows: 1) Princess Bari’s parents wed; 2) The parents give birth to a string of daughters; 3) Their seventh child again turns out to be a daughter; 4) The seventh daughter, Princess Bari, is abandoned; 5) The parents fall ill; 6) Princess Bari learns that the cure for her parents’ illness is a special spring water; 7) Princess Bari meets her parents; 8) The six other daughters all refuse to go find the spring water; 9) Princess Bari sets out to find the spring; 10) Princess Bari encounters the keeper of the spring; 11) Princess Bari pays a price in exchange for the spring water; 12) Princess Bari saves her parents; 13) Princess Bari’s contributions are honored.

The epic reflects traditional Korean views of the afterworld and the spiritual realm, the most notable aspect being the horizontal, rather than vertical, spatial concept of the afterworld and reality. Central to the theme is the traditional virtue of filial piety, as conveyed in the story of the abandoned daughter making sacrifices for her parents. The literary significance of “Barigongju” lies in the motive of the sacred mother myth, emphasizing the maternal qualities in women, and also in the tradition of narratives depicting women overcoming ordeals in a male-centered world.

Song of Abandoned Princess Bari

Song of Abandoned Princess Bari
Headword

바리공주 ( 钵里公主 , Barigongju )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Shamanic Mythology

Writer HongTaehan(洪泰漢)

“Barigongju, ” or “Song of Abandoned Princess Bari, ” is an epic song performed as part of various shamanic rituals including the Malmi (Prayer) Segment of jinogigut, the underworld entry ritual from the Seoul area; the Ogupuri (Song of Ogu) Segment of the grievance cleansing ritual ssitgimgut from South Jeolla Province; and the Balwongut (Prayer Ritual) Segment of the underworld entry ritual ogugut from the eastern coast regions.

Barigongju, or Princess Bari, is the name used in the Seoul area for the heroine of the epic, and is called Baridegi in Jeolla and on the eastern coast. Over ninety versions of the song from around the country have been recorded and archived, offering a comprehensive pool of materials for studying the process of their transmission through history. Details vary by region, but the common plot goes as follows: 1) Princess Bari’s parents wed; 2) The parents give birth to a string of daughters; 3) Their seventh child again turns out to be a daughter; 4) The seventh daughter, Princess Bari, is abandoned; 5) The parents fall ill; 6) Princess Bari learns that the cure for her parents’ illness is a special spring water; 7) Princess Bari meets her parents; 8) The six other daughters all refuse to go find the spring water; 9) Princess Bari sets out to find the spring; 10) Princess Bari encounters the keeper of the spring; 11) Princess Bari pays a price in exchange for the spring water; 12) Princess Bari saves her parents; 13) Princess Bari’s contributions are honored.

The epic reflects traditional Korean views of the afterworld and the spiritual realm, the most notable aspect being the horizontal, rather than vertical, spatial concept of the afterworld and reality. Central to the theme is the traditional virtue of filial piety, as conveyed in the story of the abandoned daughter making sacrifices for her parents. The literary significance of “Barigongju” lies in the motive of the sacred mother myth, emphasizing the maternal qualities in women, and also in the tradition of narratives depicting women overcoming ordeals in a male-centered world.