Gate God(門神)

Gate God

Headword

문신 ( 門神 , Munsin )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Divinities

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

Munsin, or Gate God, is a deity that invites in good fortune or keeps away evil spirits or impurities that can enter through the gate of a home.

Munsin is not embodied by a specific sacred entity. On Jeju Island, however, the wooden pillars (jeongjumok) and ribs (jeongsal) that comprise the island’ s distinctive makeshift gates are believed to embody the god that is called Munjeonsin (God Outside the Gate). The practical function of this gate is to keep out cattle, and they are installed not only at houses but in the fields as well. In Jeju, Munjeonsin oversees all domestic affairs and is also referred to as the personified name Namseonbi. Shamans call door gods Sumundaegam (State Official God of the Gates) and in Jinan, North Jeolla Province, the gate god is called Mungandaegam.

In Korean folk religion, it is believed that a god resides in every door, but the door god is generally not worshipped in a separate ritual but with a simple acknowledgement of leaving a small piece of rice cake at the gate after a household gods ritual (gosa). On Jeju Island, however, where gates are viewed as highly important, every household ritual includes the narrative song “Munjeonbonpuri (Origin of the Gate God)” and a ritual for the gate god (munjeongosa) is held upon moving into a new house.

Gate God

Gate God
Headword

문신 ( 門神 , Munsin )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Divinities

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

Munsin, or Gate God, is a deity that invites in good fortune or keeps away evil spirits or impurities that can enter through the gate of a home.

Munsin is not embodied by a specific sacred entity. On Jeju Island, however, the wooden pillars (jeongjumok) and ribs (jeongsal) that comprise the island’ s distinctive makeshift gates are believed to embody the god that is called Munjeonsin (God Outside the Gate). The practical function of this gate is to keep out cattle, and they are installed not only at houses but in the fields as well. In Jeju, Munjeonsin oversees all domestic affairs and is also referred to as the personified name Namseonbi. Shamans call door gods Sumundaegam (State Official God of the Gates) and in Jinan, North Jeolla Province, the gate god is called Mungandaegam.

In Korean folk religion, it is believed that a god resides in every door, but the door god is generally not worshipped in a separate ritual but with a simple acknowledgement of leaving a small piece of rice cake at the gate after a household gods ritual (gosa). On Jeju Island, however, where gates are viewed as highly important, every household ritual includes the narrative song “Munjeonbonpuri (Origin of the Gate God)” and a ritual for the gate god (munjeongosa) is held upon moving into a new house.