Shrine painting(感慕如在圖)

Shrine painting

Headword

감모여재도 ( 感慕如在圖 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

A painting depicting a shrine with an empty box in the center, where a paper spirit tablet is attached during an ancestral memorial rite.

The tradition of using shrine paintings called “Gammoyeojaedo” is related with the establishment of Confucian ancestral memorial rites in Joseon. As part of their efforts to establish Confucian traditions in family rites and ceremonies, the founders of the Joseon dynasty placed greater importance on performing funeral and memorial rites according to Confucian traditions. They encouraged people to have their own family shrines, but with limited results. The establishment of Confucian ceremonies throughout Joseon society after the Japanese invasions (1592-1598) led more families to build their own shrines, and by the mid 18th century the practice of sadaebongsa (Kor. 사대봉사, Chin. 四代奉祀, conducting memorial rites for the four latest generations of ancestors) had become widespread. Despite the changes, many ordinary families were not able to afford their own shrine and had to rely on a paper spirit tablet when conducting the rites. In addition, it was not easy for even the scholar-officials who had their own family shrine to move the shrine and ancestral spirit tablets when they were sent to serve in a new place, typically for a period of less than a year. This explains why the use of the shrine paintings became so widespread.

Devised as a kind of religious painting intended for use in ancestral memorial rites, “Gammoyeojaedo” is full of symbolic images. First, the painting contains images symbolizing the permanence of family ties. Second, it also has symbolic images representing the descendants’ aspirations for wealth and prosperity of their family. Third, the painting emphasizes the sacredness of family shrines. Fourth, it expresses that those using the painting are a noble family devoted to Confucian virtues. Finally, the painting also symbolizes the practice of conducting ancestral memorial rites. The painting may not clearly state or stress that Confucianism is a religion, but lays great emphasis on the practice of memorial rites, which is considered a primary function of religion.

Shrine painting

Shrine painting
Headword

감모여재도 ( 感慕如在圖 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

A painting depicting a shrine with an empty box in the center, where a paper spirit tablet is attached during an ancestral memorial rite.

The tradition of using shrine paintings called “Gammoyeojaedo” is related with the establishment of Confucian ancestral memorial rites in Joseon. As part of their efforts to establish Confucian traditions in family rites and ceremonies, the founders of the Joseon dynasty placed greater importance on performing funeral and memorial rites according to Confucian traditions. They encouraged people to have their own family shrines, but with limited results. The establishment of Confucian ceremonies throughout Joseon society after the Japanese invasions (1592-1598) led more families to build their own shrines, and by the mid 18th century the practice of sadaebongsa (Kor. 사대봉사, Chin. 四代奉祀, conducting memorial rites for the four latest generations of ancestors) had become widespread. Despite the changes, many ordinary families were not able to afford their own shrine and had to rely on a paper spirit tablet when conducting the rites. In addition, it was not easy for even the scholar-officials who had their own family shrine to move the shrine and ancestral spirit tablets when they were sent to serve in a new place, typically for a period of less than a year. This explains why the use of the shrine paintings became so widespread.

Devised as a kind of religious painting intended for use in ancestral memorial rites, “Gammoyeojaedo” is full of symbolic images. First, the painting contains images symbolizing the permanence of family ties. Second, it also has symbolic images representing the descendants’ aspirations for wealth and prosperity of their family. Third, the painting emphasizes the sacredness of family shrines. Fourth, it expresses that those using the painting are a noble family devoted to Confucian virtues. Finally, the painting also symbolizes the practice of conducting ancestral memorial rites. The painting may not clearly state or stress that Confucianism is a religion, but lays great emphasis on the practice of memorial rites, which is considered a primary function of religion.