Paper Flower(梅花)

Headword

매화 ( 梅花 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Ritual Props

Writer SimSangkyo(沈相敎)

Jihwa, or paper flowers, are ornaments used for expressing devotion to the gods in a shamanic ritual.

Paper flower ornaments, also called sinmyeongkkot (spirit flower) or muhwa (shamanic flower), are considered sacred, on display for the purpose of entertaining the gods, of creating a venue where the deity will be surrounded by flowers while receiving the ritual, and they come in many different kinds with different uses and meanings.

Geolliphwa (collector god flower) is used in bigscale rituals like mangudaetaekgut, observed in Hwanghae Province to pray for longevity in the elderly. It is also called mudonghwa, or child dancer flower, because the way the shaman dances when possessed by the Collector God resembles a child. Geolliphwa is prepared for one-time use in a ritual.

Deombulgukhwa (chrysanthemum bundle) is a type of paper flower offered on the ritual table in the east coast regions, an abundant bundle of chrysanthemums in the shape of a half-sphere.

Darihwa is a paper rendering of an imaginary flower, offered on ritual tables in Seoul and in the east coast regions. It is believed that large flowers scare away ghosts, and darihwa’s huge blossoms contribute to this function.

Seorihwa is also an imaginary flower, believed to blossom on snow, without roots. In shamanic rituals in Hwanghae Province, the shaman holds a seorihwa blossom in her hand as she officiates parts of the ritual, an attempt at purifying the venue with a flower considered clean and pure.

Josanghwa (ancestor flowers) are paper flowers offered on the ritual table to invite the ancestors from both the father’s and the mother’s side of the family, and also the in-laws.

Supallyeon is the largest type of jihwa, made only for special rites observed in the Seoul and Gyeonggi regions and in Hwanghae Province. It is also an imaginary flower, and is featured prominently in Korea’s Buddhist and shamanic rituals.

Baengnyeonhwa is a type of flower used sometimes as part of supallyeon, or placed on the ritual table for the goddess of childbearing Chilseongjeseok.

Paper Flower

Paper Flower
Headword

매화 ( 梅花 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Ritual Props

Writer SimSangkyo(沈相敎)

Jihwa, or paper flowers, are ornaments used for expressing devotion to the gods in a shamanic ritual.

Paper flower ornaments, also called sinmyeongkkot (spirit flower) or muhwa (shamanic flower), are considered sacred, on display for the purpose of entertaining the gods, of creating a venue where the deity will be surrounded by flowers while receiving the ritual, and they come in many different kinds with different uses and meanings.

Geolliphwa (collector god flower) is used in bigscale rituals like mangudaetaekgut, observed in Hwanghae Province to pray for longevity in the elderly. It is also called mudonghwa, or child dancer flower, because the way the shaman dances when possessed by the Collector God resembles a child. Geolliphwa is prepared for one-time use in a ritual.

Deombulgukhwa (chrysanthemum bundle) is a type of paper flower offered on the ritual table in the east coast regions, an abundant bundle of chrysanthemums in the shape of a half-sphere.

Darihwa is a paper rendering of an imaginary flower, offered on ritual tables in Seoul and in the east coast regions. It is believed that large flowers scare away ghosts, and darihwa’s huge blossoms contribute to this function.

Seorihwa is also an imaginary flower, believed to blossom on snow, without roots. In shamanic rituals in Hwanghae Province, the shaman holds a seorihwa blossom in her hand as she officiates parts of the ritual, an attempt at purifying the venue with a flower considered clean and pure.

Josanghwa (ancestor flowers) are paper flowers offered on the ritual table to invite the ancestors from both the father’s and the mother’s side of the family, and also the in-laws.

Supallyeon is the largest type of jihwa, made only for special rites observed in the Seoul and Gyeonggi regions and in Hwanghae Province. It is also an imaginary flower, and is featured prominently in Korea’s Buddhist and shamanic rituals.

Baengnyeonhwa is a type of flower used sometimes as part of supallyeon, or placed on the ritual table for the goddess of childbearing Chilseongjeseok.