Shrine for Rain Rite(錦山淸澄淵祈雨祭堂)

Shrine for Rain Rite

Headword

금산청징연기우제당 ( 錦山淸澄淵祈雨祭堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer LeeHaejun(李海濬)

Giujedang is a shrine for holding rain rites (giuje) in times of drought.

Rain rites are held inside rock caves or by ponds or springs deep in the mountains. Some wellknown giujedang where these rites have long been held include the shrine at Mt. Jinak’s Mulgul Peak in Geumsan, South Chungcheong Province; the shrine at Cheongjing Pond in the village of Samgari in Jinsan, South Chungcheong; and Dragon Pond at Handugol Valley in the village of Sangbancheolli in Samcheok, Gangwon Province.

The Mulgul Peak Giujedang in Mt. Jinak is a natural shrine without a building or spirit tablet, a large rock cave with a pond inside that is believed to be deeper than the entire length of a skein of silk thread unraveled. In old times, when news spread that a rain rite would be held here, people from surrounding villages headed to the summit of Mt. Jinak, with spades and hoes in hand and accompanied by farmers’ percussion music. Taboo ropes (geumjul) were hung on the gates of each home on the day before the rite, along with a bottle filled with water and closed with a bunch of pine needles then hung upside down.

Cheongjing Pond served as a rain rite shrine since Joseon and until as recent as the early 1990s. There is an underwater cave at the bottom of the pond, where a dragon or imugi (imaginary python that failed in its attempt to become a dragon) is believed to live. The rain rite at this pond was attended by all the residents of three surrounding villages, both men and women, the old and the young. The women led the way, parading to the pond playing percussion music and wearing a winnow basket (ki) on their heads. At the pond they set up a table of sacrificial foods and staged a Confucian-style rain rite. After the rite, the women staged a rainfall performance by sprinkling water with their baskets or bowls, or stepping inside the pond and splashing water on one another.

The Dragon Pond at Handu Valley is located inside a rock cave on a cliff. Sacrificial offerings for a rain rite at this pond included a whole dog, steamed rice (me), cooked vegetables and coarse rice wine makgeolli. The dog was not offered as food but as a means of upsetting Yongwang (Dragon King) by throwing it into the pond and polluting the pond with bad blood, which the deity would try to wash away with rain.

Shrine for Rain Rite

Shrine for Rain Rite
Headword

금산청징연기우제당 ( 錦山淸澄淵祈雨祭堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer LeeHaejun(李海濬)

Giujedang is a shrine for holding rain rites (giuje) in times of drought.

Rain rites are held inside rock caves or by ponds or springs deep in the mountains. Some wellknown giujedang where these rites have long been held include the shrine at Mt. Jinak’s Mulgul Peak in Geumsan, South Chungcheong Province; the shrine at Cheongjing Pond in the village of Samgari in Jinsan, South Chungcheong; and Dragon Pond at Handugol Valley in the village of Sangbancheolli in Samcheok, Gangwon Province.

The Mulgul Peak Giujedang in Mt. Jinak is a natural shrine without a building or spirit tablet, a large rock cave with a pond inside that is believed to be deeper than the entire length of a skein of silk thread unraveled. In old times, when news spread that a rain rite would be held here, people from surrounding villages headed to the summit of Mt. Jinak, with spades and hoes in hand and accompanied by farmers’ percussion music. Taboo ropes (geumjul) were hung on the gates of each home on the day before the rite, along with a bottle filled with water and closed with a bunch of pine needles then hung upside down.

Cheongjing Pond served as a rain rite shrine since Joseon and until as recent as the early 1990s. There is an underwater cave at the bottom of the pond, where a dragon or imugi (imaginary python that failed in its attempt to become a dragon) is believed to live. The rain rite at this pond was attended by all the residents of three surrounding villages, both men and women, the old and the young. The women led the way, parading to the pond playing percussion music and wearing a winnow basket (ki) on their heads. At the pond they set up a table of sacrificial foods and staged a Confucian-style rain rite. After the rite, the women staged a rainfall performance by sprinkling water with their baskets or bowls, or stepping inside the pond and splashing water on one another.

The Dragon Pond at Handu Valley is located inside a rock cave on a cliff. Sacrificial offerings for a rain rite at this pond included a whole dog, steamed rice (me), cooked vegetables and coarse rice wine makgeolli. The dog was not offered as food but as a means of upsetting Yongwang (Dragon King) by throwing it into the pond and polluting the pond with bad blood, which the deity would try to wash away with rain.