Painting of Shamanic Deity(國師堂 巫神圖)

Painting of Shamanic Deity

Headword

국사당 무신도 ( 國師堂 巫神圖 )

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Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Ritual Props

Writer LeeGunwook(李健昱)

Musindo is the painting of a deity worshipped by a shaman.

Such paintings are also called muhwa (shamanic painting) or hwabun, and are hung in the personal shrines of possessed shamans (gangsinmu) or in village shrines. Musindo takes up great significance in shamanic practice and all possessed shamans enshrine paintings of deities that have descended upon them. They are generally individual paintings, painted in color on paper or silk. The oldest remaining musindo in Korea are the paintings in the shrine for the village gods (guksadang) on Mt. Inwang in Seoul. These paintings were designated as Important Folklore Heritage in 1970. There are seventeen in all, of King Taejo, the founder of Joseon; Lady Gang; Hoguassi (Measles Maiden); Yongwang (Dragon King); Sansin (Mountain God); Changbu (Clown God); Sinjang (Shamanic Guardian God); Great Monk Muhak; Great Scholar Gwak Gwak (Guo Pu); Dangun, founder of Korea’s first kingdom; Triad Jeseok (Goddess of Childbirth); Royal Preceptor Naong of Goryeo; Chilseok (Seven Stars); Gunung (Martial Hero Deity); General Geumseong; Empress Myeongseong of Joseon; and General Choe Yeong (Choe Yeong Janggun) of Goryeo.

Another historically important musindo are the paintings from Naewat Shrine in Yongdam-dong of Jeju Island. The entire work is believed to have comprised twelve panels but now only ten remain, six with paintings of male deities and four with those of female deities. They were designated as Important Folklore Heritage in 2001 and are now housed at the Jeju National University Museum. The Naewat Shrine musindo are very different from those found on the Korean peninsula, in terms of color, sensibility and the facial features portrayed. They are also invaluable in that Naewat Shrine was a very influential institution as one of Jeju’s four biggest government shrines.

Painting of Shamanic Deity

Painting of Shamanic Deity
Headword

국사당 무신도 ( 國師堂 巫神圖 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Ritual Props

Writer LeeGunwook(李健昱)

Musindo is the painting of a deity worshipped by a shaman.

Such paintings are also called muhwa (shamanic painting) or hwabun, and are hung in the personal shrines of possessed shamans (gangsinmu) or in village shrines. Musindo takes up great significance in shamanic practice and all possessed shamans enshrine paintings of deities that have descended upon them. They are generally individual paintings, painted in color on paper or silk. The oldest remaining musindo in Korea are the paintings in the shrine for the village gods (guksadang) on Mt. Inwang in Seoul. These paintings were designated as Important Folklore Heritage in 1970. There are seventeen in all, of King Taejo, the founder of Joseon; Lady Gang; Hoguassi (Measles Maiden); Yongwang (Dragon King); Sansin (Mountain God); Changbu (Clown God); Sinjang (Shamanic Guardian God); Great Monk Muhak; Great Scholar Gwak Gwak (Guo Pu); Dangun, founder of Korea’s first kingdom; Triad Jeseok (Goddess of Childbirth); Royal Preceptor Naong of Goryeo; Chilseok (Seven Stars); Gunung (Martial Hero Deity); General Geumseong; Empress Myeongseong of Joseon; and General Choe Yeong (Choe Yeong Janggun) of Goryeo.

Another historically important musindo are the paintings from Naewat Shrine in Yongdam-dong of Jeju Island. The entire work is believed to have comprised twelve panels but now only ten remain, six with paintings of male deities and four with those of female deities. They were designated as Important Folklore Heritage in 2001 and are now housed at the Jeju National University Museum. The Naewat Shrine musindo are very different from those found on the Korean peninsula, in terms of color, sensibility and the facial features portrayed. They are also invaluable in that Naewat Shrine was a very influential institution as one of Jeju’s four biggest government shrines.