Hwajeon Nori

Hwajeon Nori

Headword

화전놀이 ( Hwajeon Nori )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

A custom having a picnic on a mountain or field while cooking hwajeon on the 3rd of the third month of the lunar calendar.

In some regions, women picked azalea flowers to decorate the hwajeon (flower rice pancakes), hence the name Hwajeon Nori. Hwajeon Nori is also referred to as Hwaryu Nori, however, the former later became the official name. In particular, women in Gyeongsang-do Province also wrote lyrics and played the janggu, as well as cooked hwajeon in order to enjoy themselves. Hwajeonga, songs played for the Hwajeon Nori, also feature a range of themes. Hwajeonga is one of major types of songs created by women songwriters and helps create an image for listeners of the Hwajeon Nori.

The female songwriters not only enjoyed the Hwajeon Nori, which was held once a year, but also created and shared lyrics about how they felt on that day. The custom that those songs were spread across regions where women moved to get married was present up through the 1950s in Gyeongsang-do Province. Some hwajeonga did not express much joy during the playing of the Hwajeon Nori due to Confucian ideology, while others nicely conveyed the unique feelings of women during the times. It is notable that some lyrics described the sense of freedom of women from yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) families could enjoy, who typically had few chances to get out of the house and breathe the fresh air.

The hwajeonga and Hwajeon Nori were then integrated with each other in the early 19th century. Around this time, women began to enjoy hwajeonga, and once songwriting and singing became a key aspect of Hwajeon Nori, the women’s Hwajeon Nori transformed into quite a different custom, especially compared to the women’s version of earlier days or the contemporary male version. Eventually, Hwajeon Nori even played the role as the birthplace of hwajeonga.

Hwajeon Nori

Hwajeon Nori
Headword

화전놀이 ( Hwajeon Nori )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

A custom having a picnic on a mountain or field while cooking hwajeon on the 3rd of the third month of the lunar calendar.

In some regions, women picked azalea flowers to decorate the hwajeon (flower rice pancakes), hence the name Hwajeon Nori. Hwajeon Nori is also referred to as Hwaryu Nori, however, the former later became the official name. In particular, women in Gyeongsang-do Province also wrote lyrics and played the janggu, as well as cooked hwajeon in order to enjoy themselves. Hwajeonga, songs played for the Hwajeon Nori, also feature a range of themes. Hwajeonga is one of major types of songs created by women songwriters and helps create an image for listeners of the Hwajeon Nori.

The female songwriters not only enjoyed the Hwajeon Nori, which was held once a year, but also created and shared lyrics about how they felt on that day. The custom that those songs were spread across regions where women moved to get married was present up through the 1950s in Gyeongsang-do Province. Some hwajeonga did not express much joy during the playing of the Hwajeon Nori due to Confucian ideology, while others nicely conveyed the unique feelings of women during the times. It is notable that some lyrics described the sense of freedom of women from yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) families could enjoy, who typically had few chances to get out of the house and breathe the fresh air.

The hwajeonga and Hwajeon Nori were then integrated with each other in the early 19th century. Around this time, women began to enjoy hwajeonga, and once songwriting and singing became a key aspect of Hwajeon Nori, the women’s Hwajeon Nori transformed into quite a different custom, especially compared to the women’s version of earlier days or the contemporary male version. Eventually, Hwajeon Nori even played the role as the birthplace of hwajeonga.