Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori

Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer ChoJunghyun(曺鼎鉉)

A custom taking place among the yangban class on the 16th of the seventh month of the lunar calendar in Hahoe-ri of Pungcheon-myeon, Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do Province.

Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori is a traditional game passed down among people of the Hahoe Village and appears to be a combination of the yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) class riding in a boat and fireworks commemorating the Buddha’s Birthday. It is a folk custom where a pouch filled with charcoal powder clings to each rope hung in the air and is lit up with fire to ignite the fireworks. As a mix of fireworks, boating, eggshell lights, and a poetry reading on a boat, this tradition is the essence of the yangban’s entertainment culture, with its classical sense of grace and dignity. The tradition consists of boating, lighting a rope, and creating a fall of flames and eggshell lights. Boat riding is a major part of the ritual, while the others are on the periphery help bolster the joy and excitement. Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori is performed at Buyongdae, Mansongjeong and Kkotnae in Hahoe-ri, Pungcheon-myeon. Making ropes for the fireworks can be very expensive and requires a great deal of effort as explained below.

First, mix mulberry charcoal powder with the powder of its bark, add some salt, and pour the mixture into a pouch or a bag. The pouch is made of traditional window paper and is 45 cm long and 2 to 3 cm wide. The pouch is then bound with a thick string every 5 to 6 cm along the length. Pouches are hung every 4 to 5 m along a straw rope in the early evening. The straw rope is then hung between a pine tree on the hill of Buyongdae and another thick pine tree below in Mansongjeong. A fire is lit to a pouch at the side toward Mansongjeong, and the other end of the rope in Buyongdae is pulled away slowly. The lighting ropes are hung over three to four places and takes a couple of hours for all the pouches to burn up.

Amid the moonrise of the 16th of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, six to seven Confucian scholars ride a boat along the river. Those people are well-renowned scholars living in Hahoe Village along with invited poets and painters from nearby villages. The boat has four poles to hold a veil above them and small lanterns to illuminate the surroundings. They enjoy alcoholic drinks and encourage each other to recite poems in Jeokbyeokbu, commencing this tradition. While they enjoy the autumn breeze and the brilliant moonlight with the poetry reading on the boat, they can also watch exotic, vibrant fireworks ignite along the lighting ropes reflected on the river. Meanwhile, a pack of 200 to 300 eggshell lights take a journey from a rock called Hyeongjeam in the vicinity of Buyongdae, and they slowly drift along the stream to reach a small pond in Ogyeonjeong, before circling around to add excitement and fun to the boat riding. It is at this moment that the falling flames become visible.

When the boat riders announce that they have composed a new poem, the audience gathering at the riverside shout “Falling flames!” Then three to four people standing on the cliff at Buyongdae throw a bundle of burning pine twigs into the river. The fire turns into a glaring fireball during its fall and shatters into pieces when hitting the rocks along the cliff, making for quite a spectacle. Pouches filled with mulberry charcoal powder were usually prepared to expel evil spirits during Gwisinjulbul Dalgi. The pouch of the mulberry charcoal powder was hung under a tall pole in front of the gate to repel any demons that might try to enter the house with the help of a bright full moon. An eggshell light has a wick made of paper or a cotton ball stuck to an eggshell, which is filled with oil. A more modernized version involves making them from a piece of dry gourd and a cotton ball soaked in oil.

Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori

Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer ChoJunghyun(曺鼎鉉)

A custom taking place among the yangban class on the 16th of the seventh month of the lunar calendar in Hahoe-ri of Pungcheon-myeon, Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do Province.

Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori is a traditional game passed down among people of the Hahoe Village and appears to be a combination of the yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) class riding in a boat and fireworks commemorating the Buddha’s Birthday. It is a folk custom where a pouch filled with charcoal powder clings to each rope hung in the air and is lit up with fire to ignite the fireworks. As a mix of fireworks, boating, eggshell lights, and a poetry reading on a boat, this tradition is the essence of the yangban’s entertainment culture, with its classical sense of grace and dignity. The tradition consists of boating, lighting a rope, and creating a fall of flames and eggshell lights. Boat riding is a major part of the ritual, while the others are on the periphery help bolster the joy and excitement. Hahoe Seonyu Julbul Nori is performed at Buyongdae, Mansongjeong and Kkotnae in Hahoe-ri, Pungcheon-myeon. Making ropes for the fireworks can be very expensive and requires a great deal of effort as explained below.

First, mix mulberry charcoal powder with the powder of its bark, add some salt, and pour the mixture into a pouch or a bag. The pouch is made of traditional window paper and is 45 cm long and 2 to 3 cm wide. The pouch is then bound with a thick string every 5 to 6 cm along the length. Pouches are hung every 4 to 5 m along a straw rope in the early evening. The straw rope is then hung between a pine tree on the hill of Buyongdae and another thick pine tree below in Mansongjeong. A fire is lit to a pouch at the side toward Mansongjeong, and the other end of the rope in Buyongdae is pulled away slowly. The lighting ropes are hung over three to four places and takes a couple of hours for all the pouches to burn up.

Amid the moonrise of the 16th of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, six to seven Confucian scholars ride a boat along the river. Those people are well-renowned scholars living in Hahoe Village along with invited poets and painters from nearby villages. The boat has four poles to hold a veil above them and small lanterns to illuminate the surroundings. They enjoy alcoholic drinks and encourage each other to recite poems in Jeokbyeokbu, commencing this tradition. While they enjoy the autumn breeze and the brilliant moonlight with the poetry reading on the boat, they can also watch exotic, vibrant fireworks ignite along the lighting ropes reflected on the river. Meanwhile, a pack of 200 to 300 eggshell lights take a journey from a rock called Hyeongjeam in the vicinity of Buyongdae, and they slowly drift along the stream to reach a small pond in Ogyeonjeong, before circling around to add excitement and fun to the boat riding. It is at this moment that the falling flames become visible.

When the boat riders announce that they have composed a new poem, the audience gathering at the riverside shout “Falling flames!” Then three to four people standing on the cliff at Buyongdae throw a bundle of burning pine twigs into the river. The fire turns into a glaring fireball during its fall and shatters into pieces when hitting the rocks along the cliff, making for quite a spectacle. Pouches filled with mulberry charcoal powder were usually prepared to expel evil spirits during Gwisinjulbul Dalgi. The pouch of the mulberry charcoal powder was hung under a tall pole in front of the gate to repel any demons that might try to enter the house with the help of a bright full moon. An eggshell light has a wick made of paper or a cotton ball stuck to an eggshell, which is filled with oil. A more modernized version involves making them from a piece of dry gourd and a cotton ball soaked in oil.