Pulgaksi Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer SeoHaesook(徐海淑)

A game making and decorating bridal dolls using various types of grass during the summer.

This game was normally played during the summer, the peak season of grass growth, and would involve making dolls using tough grass. According to the records of this game that had been played, spanning the Three Kingdoms Period and Joseon Period, it was a game similar to that of Sokkup Nori (playing house) by modern-day girls. It typically included playing house while little girls made a grass bride, conduct a wedding ceremony, and playing out the first night between a newly-wed couple.

Pulgaksi Nori requires 15 cm long sorghum straws or peeled twigs, and the leaves of gaksipul (a type of rice) grown under walls, or by the edges of rice fields, as much as needed. The leaves are blanched in boiling water to be softened, then tied to the top of a twig or a sorghum straw by threads, and brushed upward to be finely combed. The leaves eventually develop a likeness to that of human hair. Girls made the hair of single women by braiding it, or putting the hair in a bun. Then they played with the dolls, while sometimes making the arms of a doll and dressing it with an upper garment and skirt. After creating a bride, girls made a groom as well. They prepared a wedding table for the dolls, made the dolls bow, facing each other, prepared a room for the dolls, and pretended to engage in a feast using pieces of chinaware filled with dirt.

Pulgaksi Nori was an iconic folk game reflecting the traditional game for girls. In the past, during an era without any factory-made toys, girls made simple dolls by themselves using natural materials. They would compete with one another over the beauty of the dolls after decorating them with a dress and other trimmings, as well as imitate the first night of a newly-wed couple. The game helped children create simple yet fantastic ways to express their hopes and dreams that they someday wished to fulfill.

Pulgaksi Nori

Pulgaksi Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer SeoHaesook(徐海淑)

A game making and decorating bridal dolls using various types of grass during the summer.

This game was normally played during the summer, the peak season of grass growth, and would involve making dolls using tough grass. According to the records of this game that had been played, spanning the Three Kingdoms Period and Joseon Period, it was a game similar to that of Sokkup Nori (playing house) by modern-day girls. It typically included playing house while little girls made a grass bride, conduct a wedding ceremony, and playing out the first night between a newly-wed couple.

Pulgaksi Nori requires 15 cm long sorghum straws or peeled twigs, and the leaves of gaksipul (a type of rice) grown under walls, or by the edges of rice fields, as much as needed. The leaves are blanched in boiling water to be softened, then tied to the top of a twig or a sorghum straw by threads, and brushed upward to be finely combed. The leaves eventually develop a likeness to that of human hair. Girls made the hair of single women by braiding it, or putting the hair in a bun. Then they played with the dolls, while sometimes making the arms of a doll and dressing it with an upper garment and skirt. After creating a bride, girls made a groom as well. They prepared a wedding table for the dolls, made the dolls bow, facing each other, prepared a room for the dolls, and pretended to engage in a feast using pieces of chinaware filled with dirt.

Pulgaksi Nori was an iconic folk game reflecting the traditional game for girls. In the past, during an era without any factory-made toys, girls made simple dolls by themselves using natural materials. They would compete with one another over the beauty of the dolls after decorating them with a dress and other trimmings, as well as imitate the first night of a newly-wed couple. The game helped children create simple yet fantastic ways to express their hopes and dreams that they someday wished to fulfill.