Tuho

Tuho

Headword

투호 ( Tuho )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer ChoJunghyun(曺鼎鉉)

A game throwing as many red and blue arrows as possible into a bottle or a pot to decide a winner.

Tuho was a game mainly played by royal families or yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) households. It was an old folk game even mentioned in Yegi (a book of rituals). The game was widely played in China during the Tang Dynasty, while believed to have been played in Korea for a long time as well. According to a historical record written in 1116, during the reign of Yejong of the Goryeo Dynasty, the king ordered to publish a rulebook of Tuho with pictures to revive the game. The game was considered an old tradition in the period and the government made an attempt to restart it systemically using a rule book. During the Joseon Period, Tuho was played mainly as the post event of a royal banquet or Giroyeon (a banquet honoring former government officials).

Tuho is a game that involves the throwing of arrows into a pot with holders that look like ears, commonly played on a lawn in the yard or at the main floor of the house. The players are divided into two teams, and throw the arrows about ten steps away from the pot. The team throwing in more arrows into the pot, or the ears of the pot, wins. Sometimes, a group of female dancers helped add excitement to the game. The arrows should drop from a point of more than 15 cm above the pot and land in the middle of the pot or the ears. The thrower should also maintain both shoulders at the same level. Winning a game of Tuho is called Hyeon, while losing a game is referred to as Bulseung. Alcoholic drinks were given to players as a reward or punishment, according to the scores. The hole of a pot is 15 cm, 12 cm, or 6 cm in diameter, and the ears come in various shapes and sizes as well. The arrows were in red and blue colors, while the game was typically played by men, yet occasionally enjoyed by women of yangban who received little opportunity to get outside of their home.

During the Joseon Period, Tuho was mainly played in royal palaces by yangban. This resulted in players following predetermined manners in playing the game, hence commoners being unable to play it due to the difficulty in preparing game material and complying with the rules of game play. Today, as traditional games are being rediscovered, everyone is getting a chance to play Tuho easily at old palaces or at public holiday festivals and events. Every traditional game experience site in local museums, historical sites, or festivals features Tuho, as it is an iconic folk game of Korea, illustrated in both school textbooks and the 1, 000 won bill.

Tuho

Tuho
Headword

투호 ( Tuho )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer ChoJunghyun(曺鼎鉉)

A game throwing as many red and blue arrows as possible into a bottle or a pot to decide a winner.

Tuho was a game mainly played by royal families or yangban (the gentry of the Joseon Period) households. It was an old folk game even mentioned in Yegi (a book of rituals). The game was widely played in China during the Tang Dynasty, while believed to have been played in Korea for a long time as well. According to a historical record written in 1116, during the reign of Yejong of the Goryeo Dynasty, the king ordered to publish a rulebook of Tuho with pictures to revive the game. The game was considered an old tradition in the period and the government made an attempt to restart it systemically using a rule book. During the Joseon Period, Tuho was played mainly as the post event of a royal banquet or Giroyeon (a banquet honoring former government officials).

Tuho is a game that involves the throwing of arrows into a pot with holders that look like ears, commonly played on a lawn in the yard or at the main floor of the house. The players are divided into two teams, and throw the arrows about ten steps away from the pot. The team throwing in more arrows into the pot, or the ears of the pot, wins. Sometimes, a group of female dancers helped add excitement to the game. The arrows should drop from a point of more than 15 cm above the pot and land in the middle of the pot or the ears. The thrower should also maintain both shoulders at the same level. Winning a game of Tuho is called Hyeon, while losing a game is referred to as Bulseung. Alcoholic drinks were given to players as a reward or punishment, according to the scores. The hole of a pot is 15 cm, 12 cm, or 6 cm in diameter, and the ears come in various shapes and sizes as well. The arrows were in red and blue colors, while the game was typically played by men, yet occasionally enjoyed by women of yangban who received little opportunity to get outside of their home.

During the Joseon Period, Tuho was mainly played in royal palaces by yangban. This resulted in players following predetermined manners in playing the game, hence commoners being unable to play it due to the difficulty in preparing game material and complying with the rules of game play. Today, as traditional games are being rediscovered, everyone is getting a chance to play Tuho easily at old palaces or at public holiday festivals and events. Every traditional game experience site in local museums, historical sites, or festivals features Tuho, as it is an iconic folk game of Korea, illustrated in both school textbooks and the 1, 000 won bill.