Cheollyeop

Cheollyeop

Headword

천렵 ( Cheollyeop )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

A folk game catching fish in creeks, mostly enjoyed by men in summer.

Cheollyeop was enjoyed during the spring or autumn, however was mostly enjoyed in the summer, including the three stages of bongnal (“dog days” of summer). The game was also about having fun in the water and was enjoyed as a way of getting the most out of the summer season. Takjok was a way of avoiding the summer heat by the waterside among male adults. The people enjoyed Takjok would place their feet in running water by the rivers or mountain streams. Seonbi (literati) would write poetry and partook in games of Cheollyeop during Takjok.

As such, the possibility was likely that Cheollyeop was enjoyed during the summer season by the waterside. Until the 1950s, many people enjoyed catching fish in the Jeongneung Valley of Seoul, which was not a unique summer custom of the city, but rather a custom enjoyed nationwide. Many people still enjoy the summer season by the waterside while eating seasonal summer food, which is perhaps originated from the memories of Cheollyeop.

Having fish stew and alcoholic drinks with friends by the waterside, alongside a stew made of the fish freshly caught during Cheollyeop, was one of the seasonal customs to beat the summer heat. The people wanting to enjoy the peak of summer would go swimming in the creeks or rivers, catch fish using nets, and make hot fish stew using the fish they caught.

Cheollyeop was a custom of catching fish in creeks with a group of accompanying friends during the summer season and was primarily witnessed at the peak of bongnal during the sixth month of the lunar calendar, including, Chobok (the initial stage of the summer heat) and Jungbok (the middle stage of the summer heat). Cheollyeop was a way to play in the water, since it was enjoyed mostly in the water while catching fish to cook up a delicious stew to beat the summer heat, providing a chance to put the saying, “Iyeolchiyeol” (literally, to fight heat with heat) to practice.

Cheollyeop

Cheollyeop
Headword

천렵 ( Cheollyeop )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer KimMyungja(金明子)

A folk game catching fish in creeks, mostly enjoyed by men in summer.

Cheollyeop was enjoyed during the spring or autumn, however was mostly enjoyed in the summer, including the three stages of bongnal (“dog days” of summer). The game was also about having fun in the water and was enjoyed as a way of getting the most out of the summer season. Takjok was a way of avoiding the summer heat by the waterside among male adults. The people enjoyed Takjok would place their feet in running water by the rivers or mountain streams. Seonbi (literati) would write poetry and partook in games of Cheollyeop during Takjok.

As such, the possibility was likely that Cheollyeop was enjoyed during the summer season by the waterside. Until the 1950s, many people enjoyed catching fish in the Jeongneung Valley of Seoul, which was not a unique summer custom of the city, but rather a custom enjoyed nationwide. Many people still enjoy the summer season by the waterside while eating seasonal summer food, which is perhaps originated from the memories of Cheollyeop.

Having fish stew and alcoholic drinks with friends by the waterside, alongside a stew made of the fish freshly caught during Cheollyeop, was one of the seasonal customs to beat the summer heat. The people wanting to enjoy the peak of summer would go swimming in the creeks or rivers, catch fish using nets, and make hot fish stew using the fish they caught.

Cheollyeop was a custom of catching fish in creeks with a group of accompanying friends during the summer season and was primarily witnessed at the peak of bongnal during the sixth month of the lunar calendar, including, Chobok (the initial stage of the summer heat) and Jungbok (the middle stage of the summer heat). Cheollyeop was a way to play in the water, since it was enjoyed mostly in the water while catching fish to cook up a delicious stew to beat the summer heat, providing a chance to put the saying, “Iyeolchiyeol” (literally, to fight heat with heat) to practice.