Jjolgijeopsi Nori

Jjolgijeopsi Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game throwing a flat stone across water in a way that it bounces off of the surface as many times as possible to decide a winner.

Jjolgijeopsi Nori (skipping stones) is a stone throwing game where players throw a flat stone by a pond, a creek, a river, or a beach onto the surface of water horizontally in order to make it skip the surface as many times as possible. This game has been played nationwide in the same manner, under the name of Jjolgijeopsi in Jeollanam-do Province, and Dolpalmae Nori, Mulsujebi Tteugi, Mulbangul Mandeulgi, in other regions.

The game itself, and required tools and skills, have been mentioned in recent a record titled Folk Games of Gwangju, having been explained as, “The stone should be flat and smooth, and the thrower should bend down in order to narrow the angle between the throwing arm and water surface as much as possible.” Picking the right stone is the key. An ideal stone is flat, yet not too bluntly shaped, with a smooth surface and light weight, making something similar to a roof tile piece the most suitable item for game play. Finding such stones is easy at the beginning, however, the more nearby stones are thrown, the more players are required to search further and further away for additional stones once the ones nearby are depleted. Once a good stone is found, the next important thing is the method of throwing. The angle between a stone and water surface upon initial contact is key. The wider the angle, the higher chance of the stone diving straight into the water. Therefore, players needed to bend their waists as much as possible to narrow the angle. There two ways of competition in general: counting the number of bounces along surface, and measuring the distance a stone is thrown on the water, while the former is more commonly used.

This game is played worldwide, since the game tool is easily found everywhere, and everyone shares the same urge of throwing. Similar to hide-andseek, or catching a tagger, stone throwing was naturally originated from the common nature of people and played everywhere around the world. This is one of the few games that has preserved its characteristic form of game play from the very beginning.

Jjolgijeopsi Nori

Jjolgijeopsi Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game throwing a flat stone across water in a way that it bounces off of the surface as many times as possible to decide a winner.

Jjolgijeopsi Nori (skipping stones) is a stone throwing game where players throw a flat stone by a pond, a creek, a river, or a beach onto the surface of water horizontally in order to make it skip the surface as many times as possible. This game has been played nationwide in the same manner, under the name of Jjolgijeopsi in Jeollanam-do Province, and Dolpalmae Nori, Mulsujebi Tteugi, Mulbangul Mandeulgi, in other regions.

The game itself, and required tools and skills, have been mentioned in recent a record titled Folk Games of Gwangju, having been explained as, “The stone should be flat and smooth, and the thrower should bend down in order to narrow the angle between the throwing arm and water surface as much as possible.” Picking the right stone is the key. An ideal stone is flat, yet not too bluntly shaped, with a smooth surface and light weight, making something similar to a roof tile piece the most suitable item for game play. Finding such stones is easy at the beginning, however, the more nearby stones are thrown, the more players are required to search further and further away for additional stones once the ones nearby are depleted. Once a good stone is found, the next important thing is the method of throwing. The angle between a stone and water surface upon initial contact is key. The wider the angle, the higher chance of the stone diving straight into the water. Therefore, players needed to bend their waists as much as possible to narrow the angle. There two ways of competition in general: counting the number of bounces along surface, and measuring the distance a stone is thrown on the water, while the former is more commonly used.

This game is played worldwide, since the game tool is easily found everywhere, and everyone shares the same urge of throwing. Similar to hide-andseek, or catching a tagger, stone throwing was naturally originated from the common nature of people and played everywhere around the world. This is one of the few games that has preserved its characteristic form of game play from the very beginning.