Jegichagi

Jegichagi

Headword

제기차기 ( Jegi Chagi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer SonJungsoo(孫正洙)

A game kicking a jegi, a coin with a hole in the middle, wrapped in silk cloth or hanji, into the air with one’s foot. The two ends of the silk or paper are threaded into the hole and torn into a number of tassels.

Jegichagi (a form of hacky sack) is one of the winter pastimes, primarily enjoyed among young Korean boys around the Lunar New Year. Although the game is mostly played by children, in the past, it used to be played by young adults, as well as the middle-aged.

There are various ways to enjoy this game. One can enjoy Jegichagi alone, or among multiple players gathering around to enjoy Jegichagi together. Methods of game play include Ttanggangaji (plain Jegichagi), where the kicking foot touches the ground for every kick; Eogichagi, where both feet are used alternately for kicking; and Heollaengi, where the foot kicking a jegi remains in the air without touching the ground. Other variations go on to include Dwitbalchagi, where players use the top lateral side of the foot to kick a jegi up in air; Muljigi, where the player continuously kicks a jegi and catches it in the mouth; Kijigi, where the player hoists the jegi in such a way that must be higher than the kicker’s height; Mureupchagi, where the player kicks a jegi with his knee; Eonjigi, where the player kicks a jegi to place it on his head, before dropping it again to keep kicking. Jegichagi can be played individually, or two to four players can form teams to compete. There are other ways for two players or more to kick a jegi as a team. Typically, players will decide upon a type of game play prior to engaging in the game, while another variation called, Samsegaji, was also enjoyed, involving multiple rounds of playing different variations before tallying up a total score.

Playing Jegichagi develops focus as well as physical fitness. Players need to maintain balance for a long period upon one foot, while moving swiftly and accurately. Thus, the game is very helpful in developing leg muscles, as well as full body movement. Also, this is a game based on pure skill, without any room for trickery. Everyone could readily play Jegichagi because a yeopjeon (an old brass coin), or a coin and paper, were the only required materials needed to play.

Jegichagi

Jegichagi
Headword

제기차기 ( Jegi Chagi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer SonJungsoo(孫正洙)

A game kicking a jegi, a coin with a hole in the middle, wrapped in silk cloth or hanji, into the air with one’s foot. The two ends of the silk or paper are threaded into the hole and torn into a number of tassels.

Jegichagi (a form of hacky sack) is one of the winter pastimes, primarily enjoyed among young Korean boys around the Lunar New Year. Although the game is mostly played by children, in the past, it used to be played by young adults, as well as the middle-aged.

There are various ways to enjoy this game. One can enjoy Jegichagi alone, or among multiple players gathering around to enjoy Jegichagi together. Methods of game play include Ttanggangaji (plain Jegichagi), where the kicking foot touches the ground for every kick; Eogichagi, where both feet are used alternately for kicking; and Heollaengi, where the foot kicking a jegi remains in the air without touching the ground. Other variations go on to include Dwitbalchagi, where players use the top lateral side of the foot to kick a jegi up in air; Muljigi, where the player continuously kicks a jegi and catches it in the mouth; Kijigi, where the player hoists the jegi in such a way that must be higher than the kicker’s height; Mureupchagi, where the player kicks a jegi with his knee; Eonjigi, where the player kicks a jegi to place it on his head, before dropping it again to keep kicking. Jegichagi can be played individually, or two to four players can form teams to compete. There are other ways for two players or more to kick a jegi as a team. Typically, players will decide upon a type of game play prior to engaging in the game, while another variation called, Samsegaji, was also enjoyed, involving multiple rounds of playing different variations before tallying up a total score.

Playing Jegichagi develops focus as well as physical fitness. Players need to maintain balance for a long period upon one foot, while moving swiftly and accurately. Thus, the game is very helpful in developing leg muscles, as well as full body movement. Also, this is a game based on pure skill, without any room for trickery. Everyone could readily play Jegichagi because a yeopjeon (an old brass coin), or a coin and paper, were the only required materials needed to play.