Jachigi

Jachigi

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game hitting or bouncing a saekkija (short stick) using a eomija (long stick).

Although Jachigi had been once observed across the country, it is extremely difficult to find in the present day. There is no exact historical record telling when or where it had begun, yet Jachigi was defined by its being able to fully deploy all the functions of a wooden stick, which can be easily found anywhere without the need for special instruments. Jachigi requires an eomija and a saekkija. A typical eomija is 50 - 80 cm in length, while a saekkija is 12 to 15 cm. Wood is the primary material, which can be easily found nearby, for example, the wood of pine, acorn, ash tree, oak, and chestnut trees. A saekkija may have both points sharpened like a pencil (yangnalja), only one sharp point at a slant (oenalja), or both points dull (tomakja). Among the three types, yangnalja is the most common. This game can be played by more than two players, however teams are required for many players.

  1. Won Jachigi: It is played with a circle drawn, and unlike that of Gumeong Jachigi, there are no levels. Game play includes sending a saekkija as far as possible by hitting and measuring the distance. Before starting the game, players decide the distance of the goal, 500 ja or 1, 000 ja (the length of a ruler).
    ① Draw a circle that has about a 1 m diameter and a line 3 - 4 m far from the circle.
    ② Play rock-paper-scissors to determine the offense and the defense.
    ③ The defense stand on the line and throw a saekkija into the circle, but the offense can hit the saekkija while air-borne. The defense is then required to throw carefully so that the offense cannot hit it. If the saekkija lands in the circle, the offense will have only one chance to hit in the next full-scale stage. If the saekkija touches the circle, the offense will receive two chances. If the saekkija drops outside the circle, the offense earns three chances to hit.
    ④ After the number of opportunities to hit is determined, the offense hits saekkija with an eomija to cause it to float, before hitting it once moreto send it flying into the distance. If the defense catch the saekkija, the offense is out. However, if the defense fail to do so while the offenders gain an additional chance from the previous stage, the offense advances to where the saekkija fell and repeats what the players did at this stage all the chances are used up.
    ⑤ If the offense hits the ground instead of the saekkija or misses the saekkija in the air, the offense lose one chance.
    ⑥ After the offense use all their chances, the distance between the saekkija and the circle is measured using the eomija. Here, hitters guess and call out the distance before the actual distance is measured. For instance, a hitter may call out 30 jas. If the defense think the distance may be longer than 30 jas, they say, “Got it!” and give 30 jas to the offender without measuring. On the other hand, if the defense assumes that it would be shorter than 30 jas, they say, “Measure it!” and have the distance measured. In the latter case, if the actual distance is longer than 30 jas, the offense gets 60 jas, double the amount, or if it is 25 jas, for example, which is shorter than 30 jas, the offense receives no ja and is out. In this regard, the offense should call an appropriate amount. Occasionally, the distance is measured using the saekkija when the offense hits the saekkija twice while air-borne instead of once, while using the eomija.
    ⑦ If the offense earns points, the game continues until the offense is out or is disqualified. For teams with four people, each player takes a turn one by one as described above. The first team that achieves the preset goal distance wins.

  2. Gumeong Jachigi: Players dig a 5 cm-deep hole that is 15-20 cm in length. Players are then divided into teams, as in Won Jachigi, however Gumeong Jachigi is comprised of different levels. The level format differs depending on the region. However, it typically increases in difficulty, ending with the hardest level.
    ① Level 1: As the offense places a saekkija over the hole and gets ready to throw it using an eomija, the defense positions itself at several points in front to catch the saekkija. The offense then hits the saekkija as far as possible by lifting it with the eomija. If the defense catches the saekkija, that offensive player is out, or if the defense fail to catch it while air-borne, the defense stands on where the saekkija fell and picks it up to throw it into the hole after the offense places the eomija over the hole. If the thrown saekkija lands in the hole, hits the eomija, or falls within a 1-ja distance from the hole and the eomija, the offending player is out. Unlike level 1, the eomija is not put on the hole for the next level.
    ② Level 2: The offense sets the saekkija slantingly over the hole, hits it up, and hits it once more to send it far into the distance with the eomija. Meanwhile, the defenders can catch the saekkija, or kick it to send it inward when it is on the move. When the defenders cannot catch the saekkija, one defender picks up and throws it toward the hole. If the saekkija goes into the hole or falls within a 1-ja radius from the circle, the offending player is disqualified. Therefore, the offense has to hit the saekkija that the defense has thrown as far as possible by swinging the eomija. After this process has completed, the distance is measured from the final location of the saekkija in the same way as Circle Jachigi.
    ③ Level 3 (Hitting with both hands): Hold the saekkija in one hand, and the eomija in the other. Throw the saekkija in the air and hit it when it falls to send it flying into the distance. Game play then continues as done in level 2.
    ④ Level 4 (Hitting with one hand): Hold both the saekkija and eomija with one hand. Toss the saekkija in the air and hit it while it is dropping to send it flying into the distance.
    ⑤ Level 5 (Hitting once before final hit): Hold the saekkija with one hand and release it. Hit the saekkija upward using the eomija, and once more to send it flying into the distance.
    ⑥ Level 6 (Spinning once before final hit): Similar to level 5, however one side of the saekkija must be hit to make it spin in the air before hitting it once more.
    ⑦ Level 7 (Hitting between legs before final hit): As with level 2, stand the saekkija at a slant and put one arm between both legs to hit the saekkija using the eomija. As the saekkija ascends, pull out the arm swiftly from the legs and hit the saekkija to send it flying into the distance.
    ⑧ Other: There are various other levels, including hitting the saekkija and rotating it once before hitting the saekkija again, hitting the saekkija in the air three or four times before the final hit, and more. Depending on the region, the order of the levels may change, and/or some levels may be omitted to simplify the game.

As is the case of Won Jachigi, the first team that reaches the predetermined goal wins.

Jachigi

Jachigi
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game hitting or bouncing a saekkija (short stick) using a eomija (long stick).

Although Jachigi had been once observed across the country, it is extremely difficult to find in the present day. There is no exact historical record telling when or where it had begun, yet Jachigi was defined by its being able to fully deploy all the functions of a wooden stick, which can be easily found anywhere without the need for special instruments. Jachigi requires an eomija and a saekkija. A typical eomija is 50 - 80 cm in length, while a saekkija is 12 to 15 cm. Wood is the primary material, which can be easily found nearby, for example, the wood of pine, acorn, ash tree, oak, and chestnut trees. A saekkija may have both points sharpened like a pencil (yangnalja), only one sharp point at a slant (oenalja), or both points dull (tomakja). Among the three types, yangnalja is the most common. This game can be played by more than two players, however teams are required for many players.

Won Jachigi: It is played with a circle drawn, and unlike that of Gumeong Jachigi, there are no levels. Game play includes sending a saekkija as far as possible by hitting and measuring the distance. Before starting the game, players decide the distance of the goal, 500 ja or 1, 000 ja (the length of a ruler).
① Draw a circle that has about a 1 m diameter and a line 3 - 4 m far from the circle.
② Play rock-paper-scissors to determine the offense and the defense.
③ The defense stand on the line and throw a saekkija into the circle, but the offense can hit the saekkija while air-borne. The defense is then required to throw carefully so that the offense cannot hit it. If the saekkija lands in the circle, the offense will have only one chance to hit in the next full-scale stage. If the saekkija touches the circle, the offense will receive two chances. If the saekkija drops outside the circle, the offense earns three chances to hit.
④ After the number of opportunities to hit is determined, the offense hits saekkija with an eomija to cause it to float, before hitting it once moreto send it flying into the distance. If the defense catch the saekkija, the offense is out. However, if the defense fail to do so while the offenders gain an additional chance from the previous stage, the offense advances to where the saekkija fell and repeats what the players did at this stage all the chances are used up.
⑤ If the offense hits the ground instead of the saekkija or misses the saekkija in the air, the offense lose one chance.
⑥ After the offense use all their chances, the distance between the saekkija and the circle is measured using the eomija. Here, hitters guess and call out the distance before the actual distance is measured. For instance, a hitter may call out 30 jas. If the defense think the distance may be longer than 30 jas, they say, “Got it!” and give 30 jas to the offender without measuring. On the other hand, if the defense assumes that it would be shorter than 30 jas, they say, “Measure it!” and have the distance measured. In the latter case, if the actual distance is longer than 30 jas, the offense gets 60 jas, double the amount, or if it is 25 jas, for example, which is shorter than 30 jas, the offense receives no ja and is out. In this regard, the offense should call an appropriate amount. Occasionally, the distance is measured using the saekkija when the offense hits the saekkija twice while air-borne instead of once, while using the eomija.
⑦ If the offense earns points, the game continues until the offense is out or is disqualified. For teams with four people, each player takes a turn one by one as described above. The first team that achieves the preset goal distance wins.

Gumeong Jachigi: Players dig a 5 cm-deep hole that is 15-20 cm in length. Players are then divided into teams, as in Won Jachigi, however Gumeong Jachigi is comprised of different levels. The level format differs depending on the region. However, it typically increases in difficulty, ending with the hardest level.
① Level 1: As the offense places a saekkija over the hole and gets ready to throw it using an eomija, the defense positions itself at several points in front to catch the saekkija. The offense then hits the saekkija as far as possible by lifting it with the eomija. If the defense catches the saekkija, that offensive player is out, or if the defense fail to catch it while air-borne, the defense stands on where the saekkija fell and picks it up to throw it into the hole after the offense places the eomija over the hole. If the thrown saekkija lands in the hole, hits the eomija, or falls within a 1-ja distance from the hole and the eomija, the offending player is out. Unlike level 1, the eomija is not put on the hole for the next level.
② Level 2: The offense sets the saekkija slantingly over the hole, hits it up, and hits it once more to send it far into the distance with the eomija. Meanwhile, the defenders can catch the saekkija, or kick it to send it inward when it is on the move. When the defenders cannot catch the saekkija, one defender picks up and throws it toward the hole. If the saekkija goes into the hole or falls within a 1-ja radius from the circle, the offending player is disqualified. Therefore, the offense has to hit the saekkija that the defense has thrown as far as possible by swinging the eomija. After this process has completed, the distance is measured from the final location of the saekkija in the same way as Circle Jachigi.
③ Level 3 (Hitting with both hands): Hold the saekkija in one hand, and the eomija in the other. Throw the saekkija in the air and hit it when it falls to send it flying into the distance. Game play then continues as done in level 2.
④ Level 4 (Hitting with one hand): Hold both the saekkija and eomija with one hand. Toss the saekkija in the air and hit it while it is dropping to send it flying into the distance.
⑤ Level 5 (Hitting once before final hit): Hold the saekkija with one hand and release it. Hit the saekkija upward using the eomija, and once more to send it flying into the distance.
⑥ Level 6 (Spinning once before final hit): Similar to level 5, however one side of the saekkija must be hit to make it spin in the air before hitting it once more.
⑦ Level 7 (Hitting between legs before final hit): As with level 2, stand the saekkija at a slant and put one arm between both legs to hit the saekkija using the eomija. As the saekkija ascends, pull out the arm swiftly from the legs and hit the saekkija to send it flying into the distance.
⑧ Other: There are various other levels, including hitting the saekkija and rotating it once before hitting the saekkija again, hitting the saekkija in the air three or four times before the final hit, and more. Depending on the region, the order of the levels may change, and/or some levels may be omitted to simplify the game.

As is the case of Won Jachigi, the first team that reaches the predetermined goal wins.