Ojingeo Nori

Ojingeo Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game of offense and defense using a squid-shaped board drawn in the dirt.

Ojingeo Nori is named after the shape of its board, which looks like a squid, with characteristic circles, triangles, and squares. The game was mainly played among young boys on a vast and flat ground. The number of players varies from eight to 10 in most cases, and up to 20 if there are more players to participate on a bigger board. The board favors the offense over the defense based on its structure. Although the shape of the board may vary, the way of drawing it is similar, as described below, along with the method of game play.

First, players divide themselves into two teams and play Gawi Bawi Bo to determine the order of the offensive and defensive. The offense goes to the house at the top of the drawing while the defense goes to the body of the squid. The offense has to hop on one foot outside of their base until they cross the narrow “river” in the middle. Beyond this point, they can walk on both feet, which is not only convenient, but also provides an advantage to the offense over the defense. In this regard, the defense should strictly guard and defend the river so that no one from the offense is allowed to cross over. However, players may be out or disqualified if one of the following happens. Once a player dies, the player has to go outside the board and wait until the game is over:

① Stepping on a line.
② Standing on two feet when a player has to hop on one foot.
② Standing on two feet when a player has to hop on one fo
③ Touching the ground with hands after falling when a player is using two feet.
④ Being dragged into the opponents’ territory over a line.

The best strategy to win for the offense is to come out of their base, cross the “river” by hopping to acquire the right to walk on two feet, and go through the opening at the bottom to step on a point called mansetong. The defense can stand on two feet inside the body of the squid. However, they need to jump using one foot outside of it, unlike the offensive team. If the offense is able to get all of the members of the defense disqualified, or if at least one offender comes into contact with the mansetong, the offense wins and continues to attack during the next round. On the other hand, if the defense is able to get every player on the offense disqualified, the defense wins and takes the offensive position in the next round. As a new round begins, all the disqualified players are allowed to participate once again.

Ojingeo Nori

Ojingeo Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game of offense and defense using a squid-shaped board drawn in the dirt.

Ojingeo Nori is named after the shape of its board, which looks like a squid, with characteristic circles, triangles, and squares. The game was mainly played among young boys on a vast and flat ground. The number of players varies from eight to 10 in most cases, and up to 20 if there are more players to participate on a bigger board. The board favors the offense over the defense based on its structure. Although the shape of the board may vary, the way of drawing it is similar, as described below, along with the method of game play.

First, players divide themselves into two teams and play Gawi Bawi Bo to determine the order of the offensive and defensive. The offense goes to the house at the top of the drawing while the defense goes to the body of the squid. The offense has to hop on one foot outside of their base until they cross the narrow “river” in the middle. Beyond this point, they can walk on both feet, which is not only convenient, but also provides an advantage to the offense over the defense. In this regard, the defense should strictly guard and defend the river so that no one from the offense is allowed to cross over. However, players may be out or disqualified if one of the following happens. Once a player dies, the player has to go outside the board and wait until the game is over:

① Stepping on a line.
② Standing on two feet when a player has to hop on one foot.
② Standing on two feet when a player has to hop on one fo
③ Touching the ground with hands after falling when a player is using two feet.
④ Being dragged into the opponents’ territory over a line.

The best strategy to win for the offense is to come out of their base, cross the “river” by hopping to acquire the right to walk on two feet, and go through the opening at the bottom to step on a point called mansetong. The defense can stand on two feet inside the body of the squid. However, they need to jump using one foot outside of it, unlike the offensive team. If the offense is able to get all of the members of the defense disqualified, or if at least one offender comes into contact with the mansetong, the offense wins and continues to attack during the next round. On the other hand, if the defense is able to get every player on the offense disqualified, the defense wins and takes the offensive position in the next round. As a new round begins, all the disqualified players are allowed to participate once again.