Seokjeon

Seokjeon

Headword

석전 ( Seokjeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer HanYangmyung(韓陽明)

A game, primarily played around Jeongwol Daeboreum, dividing players into two teams by a creek or a wide street to throw rocks toward each other’s area to decide a winner.

Seokjeon was mostly played around Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar), but was also played on Dano (the festival on May 5th of the lunar year) or Chuseok (the harvest festival) as well in some regions. The game was passed down among two different tiers; one played by the Goeul (traditional administrative districts), and the other played by the villages.

There were two forms of the village version of Seokjeon. One was a naturally formed battle only played by children, and the other was a planned battle played by children at first, and later, by adults. The former was a secondary stage of battle played after the Jwibul Nori (Mouse Fire Game) or Hwaetbul Ssaum (Torch Battle) among children. The latter was a planned, yet independently and routinely held battle. Julpalmae was one of the factors distinguishing the two types of battles. If the players used Julpalmae, a tool for throwing stones, it meant that the battle was a planned and routinely held one.

The Goeul version shared similarities with the village version and was also played by teams according to the residential districts. The results of the battles used to tell the fortune for the year, while the age group of players gradually increased from children to adults over time. Although Seokjeon was banned by the authorities following the early Joseon Period due to being dangerous, the ban was ignored by most people as it was an important seasonal event handed down over the generations.

Since stone throwing was a combat skill in the pre-modern era, the game had militaristic, shamanic, religious, and recreational traits as well. However, the militaristic aspect of Seokjeon weakened as time progressed, and the game became a seasonal event for enjoyment and yearly fortune-telling.

Seokjeon

Seokjeon
Headword

석전 ( Seokjeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer HanYangmyung(韓陽明)

A game, primarily played around Jeongwol Daeboreum, dividing players into two teams by a creek or a wide street to throw rocks toward each other’s area to decide a winner.

Seokjeon was mostly played around Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar), but was also played on Dano (the festival on May 5th of the lunar year) or Chuseok (the harvest festival) as well in some regions. The game was passed down among two different tiers; one played by the Goeul (traditional administrative districts), and the other played by the villages.

There were two forms of the village version of Seokjeon. One was a naturally formed battle only played by children, and the other was a planned battle played by children at first, and later, by adults. The former was a secondary stage of battle played after the Jwibul Nori (Mouse Fire Game) or Hwaetbul Ssaum (Torch Battle) among children. The latter was a planned, yet independently and routinely held battle. Julpalmae was one of the factors distinguishing the two types of battles. If the players used Julpalmae, a tool for throwing stones, it meant that the battle was a planned and routinely held one.

The Goeul version shared similarities with the village version and was also played by teams according to the residential districts. The results of the battles used to tell the fortune for the year, while the age group of players gradually increased from children to adults over time. Although Seokjeon was banned by the authorities following the early Joseon Period due to being dangerous, the ban was ignored by most people as it was an important seasonal event handed down over the generations.

Since stone throwing was a combat skill in the pre-modern era, the game had militaristic, shamanic, religious, and recreational traits as well. However, the militaristic aspect of Seokjeon weakened as time progressed, and the game became a seasonal event for enjoyment and yearly fortune-telling.