Sabangchigi

Sabangchigi

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game drawing a game board on a flat surface, throwing stones upon it, before the players go around from the first cell to the last cell and back again.

Sabangchigi is also known as Ttangttameokgi, or Mang Jupgi. This is one of the few traditional games still being played by today’s children. There are two common types of game boards for Mang Jupgi. They are called Bihaenggi Mang Jupgi and 8 Bang Mang Jupgi. Bihaenggi Mang Jupgi is a standard game board used in other countries, while 8 Bang Mang Jupgi is used solely in Korea, however, the ways to play the game on both types of boards are nearly the same. The rules for 8 Bang Mang Jupgi are as follows.

During game play, if there is a turn to play 1 dan (the first run that starts from the first cell), the player throws a mang (a game piece) into the first cell. If the mang lands in other cells, or on a border line between cells, the throwing is considered a fail and the next player is up. Upon the mang landing in the first cell, the thrower moves to the second cell and then the rest of the cells on one foot and/or both feet. Players stand on one foot in the second and third cells, on both feet in the fourth and fifth cells, on one foot in the sixth cell, and on both feet again in the seventh and eighth cells. After reaching the last cell, players then turn around and move backward on the same foot or feet in each cell. If a player was able to pick up the mang in the first cell while standing in the second cell, then returned to the first cell, the run is successful. If a player touches a line of the board with a hand or foot, the run is considered a failure. The game proceeds from 1 dan to 8 dan, under the same rule. If a player fails at 3 dan, the player can then restart from 3 dan in the next turn. A player who successfully proceeded to 8 dan goes to the sky cell, comes back, and throws a mang into the game board while turning back from the board. If the mang lands within a cell without touching a line, the cell becomes a territory of the thrower. The owner of a cell can rest within it on both feet from the next turn, with other players being forced to jump over the cell. Players can take the cells whenever they succeed in moving from 1 dan to the sky cell, and the game ends once every cell has been occupied.

Recently, a new rule, called the elevator, has been added to the game. The rule is applied once throwing a mang into cells grows more difficult upon the progression of the game toward the high dans and only a few cells are left to take. The new rule allows the throwing in of a mang at an additional line by the game board (normally next to the fourth and fifth cells). For example, if landing a mang within the right cells gets difficult at 5 dan or higher, amid the failure of other players, the new rule can be applied for those stages. If the game is played by children of different ages, the rule can be applied to younger children only. The elevator rule was invented after the dissemination of elevators. It is a good example of the evolution of folk games along with the changing of the times.

Sabangchigi

Sabangchigi
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game drawing a game board on a flat surface, throwing stones upon it, before the players go around from the first cell to the last cell and back again.

Sabangchigi is also known as Ttangttameokgi, or Mang Jupgi. This is one of the few traditional games still being played by today’s children. There are two common types of game boards for Mang Jupgi. They are called Bihaenggi Mang Jupgi and 8 Bang Mang Jupgi. Bihaenggi Mang Jupgi is a standard game board used in other countries, while 8 Bang Mang Jupgi is used solely in Korea, however, the ways to play the game on both types of boards are nearly the same. The rules for 8 Bang Mang Jupgi are as follows.

During game play, if there is a turn to play 1 dan (the first run that starts from the first cell), the player throws a mang (a game piece) into the first cell. If the mang lands in other cells, or on a border line between cells, the throwing is considered a fail and the next player is up. Upon the mang landing in the first cell, the thrower moves to the second cell and then the rest of the cells on one foot and/or both feet. Players stand on one foot in the second and third cells, on both feet in the fourth and fifth cells, on one foot in the sixth cell, and on both feet again in the seventh and eighth cells. After reaching the last cell, players then turn around and move backward on the same foot or feet in each cell. If a player was able to pick up the mang in the first cell while standing in the second cell, then returned to the first cell, the run is successful. If a player touches a line of the board with a hand or foot, the run is considered a failure. The game proceeds from 1 dan to 8 dan, under the same rule. If a player fails at 3 dan, the player can then restart from 3 dan in the next turn. A player who successfully proceeded to 8 dan goes to the sky cell, comes back, and throws a mang into the game board while turning back from the board. If the mang lands within a cell without touching a line, the cell becomes a territory of the thrower. The owner of a cell can rest within it on both feet from the next turn, with other players being forced to jump over the cell. Players can take the cells whenever they succeed in moving from 1 dan to the sky cell, and the game ends once every cell has been occupied.

Recently, a new rule, called the elevator, has been added to the game. The rule is applied once throwing a mang into cells grows more difficult upon the progression of the game toward the high dans and only a few cells are left to take. The new rule allows the throwing in of a mang at an additional line by the game board (normally next to the fourth and fifth cells). For example, if landing a mang within the right cells gets difficult at 5 dan or higher, amid the failure of other players, the new rule can be applied for those stages. If the game is played by children of different ages, the rule can be applied to younger children only. The elevator rule was invented after the dissemination of elevators. It is a good example of the evolution of folk games along with the changing of the times.