Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida

Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game trying to gradually sneak up upon the player who is “it” during moments when that player’s eyes are closed, tap with the hand, and run away.

Given that the game does not appear in old literature, the history of Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida, similar to Red Light, Green Light, is not presumably long. However, it can be commonly found in the modern times as it does not require preparation except for a space to move, while also being fun and easy to play.

This is an independently-played game, however it is used as a form of tag, a warm-up game for more active games, or as a phrase used to signal something. For example, during other games, the one who becomes “it” shouts “Mugunghwa kochi Ppieotseumnida (The Mugungwha flower has bloomed)” with an arm raised to let others know who the new “it” is before starting the new round. As this phrase is comprised of 10 characters in Korean, shouting the phrase is the equivalent of counting from one to ten. The typical rules of game play are as follows.

First, players perform Gawi Bawi Bo to determine who is “it.” The player chosen stands with his or her back turned, facing a wall, a tree, or a pillar. The other players then draw a line about 5 - 10 m away and stand behind it. Afterward, the player who is “it” shouts, “Mugunghwa kochi pieotseumnida, ” while having turned away from the other players.

The back must be turned while shouting the phrase. Only once all the characters, or syllables, have been shouted, can the player turn around facing the other players, and if anyone is caught moving, that player is then captured. Those that are captured must stand next to the player who is “it, ” interlocking pinky fingers or holding hands. Other players then keep moving forward, a little at a time, while the game progresses and the other players start to close in. Additionally, the more players that end up captured, the longer the line. Once the player that has made it closest to the player who is “it, ” the chain of captured players can be broken by hitting the fingers or hands that are joined together.

At that moment, all the other players, including those captured, must run back to their original location behind the line without being tagged. The player that is tagged by the player who is “it” becomes “it” for the next round, however, if everyone manages to make a safe return without being tagged, the current player who is “it” retains the role into the next round as well.

The player who is “it” constantly tries to look back at the right moment to spot moving players, even though no peaking is allowed. Meanwhile, the other players try to move closer without being seen. Sometimes, players are caught frozen in an awkward position at the moment the player who is “it” turns around, providing an extra level of amusement during game play.

As of recently, other variations of this game have appeared. If the player who is “it” uses a different verb or action at the end of the phrase, the other players have to act according to the verb or action that is called out or they are captured. For example, if the player who is “it” shouts, “Mugunghwa kochi chumeul chumnida (The Mugungwha flower is dancing), ” and turns around, the other players should be dancing at that moment; or it someone says, “Mugunghwa kochi noraehamnida (The Mugungwha flower is singing), ” and turns around, the other players should start singing on the spot. Also, after the player who is “it” shouts, “Halmi kochi pieotseumnida (The Grandmother flower has bloomed), ” the other players have to mimic a grandmother; or if the phrase is changed to “Nanjangi kochi pieotseumnida (The Dwarf flower has bloomed), ” the other players must then move around in a crouched position.

These days, children rarely suggest a game to play, yet this game, in particular, is one of the few that children naturally engage in, depicting their affinity for the game. Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida is typically more popular among younger children than older children.

Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida

Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game trying to gradually sneak up upon the player who is “it” during moments when that player’s eyes are closed, tap with the hand, and run away.

Given that the game does not appear in old literature, the history of Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida, similar to Red Light, Green Light, is not presumably long. However, it can be commonly found in the modern times as it does not require preparation except for a space to move, while also being fun and easy to play.

This is an independently-played game, however it is used as a form of tag, a warm-up game for more active games, or as a phrase used to signal something. For example, during other games, the one who becomes “it” shouts “Mugunghwa kochi Ppieotseumnida (The Mugungwha flower has bloomed)” with an arm raised to let others know who the new “it” is before starting the new round. As this phrase is comprised of 10 characters in Korean, shouting the phrase is the equivalent of counting from one to ten. The typical rules of game play are as follows.

First, players perform Gawi Bawi Bo to determine who is “it.” The player chosen stands with his or her back turned, facing a wall, a tree, or a pillar. The other players then draw a line about 5 - 10 m away and stand behind it. Afterward, the player who is “it” shouts, “Mugunghwa kochi pieotseumnida, ” while having turned away from the other players.

The back must be turned while shouting the phrase. Only once all the characters, or syllables, have been shouted, can the player turn around facing the other players, and if anyone is caught moving, that player is then captured. Those that are captured must stand next to the player who is “it, ” interlocking pinky fingers or holding hands. Other players then keep moving forward, a little at a time, while the game progresses and the other players start to close in. Additionally, the more players that end up captured, the longer the line. Once the player that has made it closest to the player who is “it, ” the chain of captured players can be broken by hitting the fingers or hands that are joined together.

At that moment, all the other players, including those captured, must run back to their original location behind the line without being tagged. The player that is tagged by the player who is “it” becomes “it” for the next round, however, if everyone manages to make a safe return without being tagged, the current player who is “it” retains the role into the next round as well.

The player who is “it” constantly tries to look back at the right moment to spot moving players, even though no peaking is allowed. Meanwhile, the other players try to move closer without being seen. Sometimes, players are caught frozen in an awkward position at the moment the player who is “it” turns around, providing an extra level of amusement during game play.

As of recently, other variations of this game have appeared. If the player who is “it” uses a different verb or action at the end of the phrase, the other players have to act according to the verb or action that is called out or they are captured. For example, if the player who is “it” shouts, “Mugunghwa kochi chumeul chumnida (The Mugungwha flower is dancing), ” and turns around, the other players should be dancing at that moment; or it someone says, “Mugunghwa kochi noraehamnida (The Mugungwha flower is singing), ” and turns around, the other players should start singing on the spot. Also, after the player who is “it” shouts, “Halmi kochi pieotseumnida (The Grandmother flower has bloomed), ” the other players have to mimic a grandmother; or if the phrase is changed to “Nanjangi kochi pieotseumnida (The Dwarf flower has bloomed), ” the other players must then move around in a crouched position.

These days, children rarely suggest a game to play, yet this game, in particular, is one of the few that children naturally engage in, depicting their affinity for the game. Mugunghwa Kochi Pieotseumnida is typically more popular among younger children than older children.