Malttukbakki

Malttukbakki

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game taking turns to become a horse or a horserider by designating roles or being divided into two teams of horses and riders.

Malttukbakgi was often played primarily by boys, however, female high school students occasionally enjoyed this game in the 1990s. It still remained the most popular among young boys and male teenagers. In the past, horses were the best mode of transportation. In particular, children wanted to ride a horse, yet rarely had a chance to do so. This unmet desire materialized within this game long ago. Korean Games, published around the end of the Joseon Period, stated that this game was played not only in Korea, but also in Japan, referring to it as “Nobleman Play.”

The way to play this game can be largely categorized into two types: one is a horseman game, where a horse is moving; and the another is a horseback riding game where a horse doesn’t move. In the horseman game, a round of rockpaper- scissors determines the horses and the horsemen. The player unable to win by the end of the game becomes a horse, while the second-to-last player becomes a horseman. The horseman puts the head of the horse at the waist of the horseman and covers the eyes of the horse so that the horse cannot see other players. By doing so, the horseman prevents the horse from kicking others who would try to mount the horse. As the game begins, the horse keeps moving or kicking legs high and backward in the air, to stop others from riding forward. If the horse kicks a player, that person becomes the next horse while the primary horse becomes the next horseman. While the horse is moving, other players should try to mount the horse as quick as they can. Since more than one player could be on the back of the horse, the horse may not be able to bear the weight and flop down to the floor. In that case, the primary horse has to continue that role in the next round as well. While a player is riding the horse, the horse should twist the body to the left and right to cause the rider to fall off, while the rider should hold on for as long as possible.

The horse riding game is an offensive and defensive team match. One player of the defensive team stands against a wall or a tree. Afterward, other players of the defensive team line up in front of that person face-to-face. Then, they bend their waist, put their heads between the legs of the person in front, and hold those legs with both hands to create a large horse. Next, the offensive team runs from a far distance to acquire acceleration and vaults onto the horse with their hands, one by one. Once the first jumper lands on the end of the horse, there is no more space for the next jumper. In this regard, the first of several jumpers should move on to the front side of the horse. If a jumper falls or a foot of the riders on the back of the horse touches the ground, the teams change their respective roles. On the other hand, if the line of the defensive team collapses because the team is simply too weak, they continue on to the next round without switching roles. If the line holds up until the last rider, the front players of both teams play a round of Gawi Bawi Bo. The winning team then plays offense in the next round as the game continues.

Malttukbakki

Malttukbakki
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game taking turns to become a horse or a horserider by designating roles or being divided into two teams of horses and riders.

Malttukbakgi was often played primarily by boys, however, female high school students occasionally enjoyed this game in the 1990s. It still remained the most popular among young boys and male teenagers. In the past, horses were the best mode of transportation. In particular, children wanted to ride a horse, yet rarely had a chance to do so. This unmet desire materialized within this game long ago. Korean Games, published around the end of the Joseon Period, stated that this game was played not only in Korea, but also in Japan, referring to it as “Nobleman Play.”

The way to play this game can be largely categorized into two types: one is a horseman game, where a horse is moving; and the another is a horseback riding game where a horse doesn’t move. In the horseman game, a round of rockpaper- scissors determines the horses and the horsemen. The player unable to win by the end of the game becomes a horse, while the second-to-last player becomes a horseman. The horseman puts the head of the horse at the waist of the horseman and covers the eyes of the horse so that the horse cannot see other players. By doing so, the horseman prevents the horse from kicking others who would try to mount the horse. As the game begins, the horse keeps moving or kicking legs high and backward in the air, to stop others from riding forward. If the horse kicks a player, that person becomes the next horse while the primary horse becomes the next horseman. While the horse is moving, other players should try to mount the horse as quick as they can. Since more than one player could be on the back of the horse, the horse may not be able to bear the weight and flop down to the floor. In that case, the primary horse has to continue that role in the next round as well. While a player is riding the horse, the horse should twist the body to the left and right to cause the rider to fall off, while the rider should hold on for as long as possible.

The horse riding game is an offensive and defensive team match. One player of the defensive team stands against a wall or a tree. Afterward, other players of the defensive team line up in front of that person face-to-face. Then, they bend their waist, put their heads between the legs of the person in front, and hold those legs with both hands to create a large horse. Next, the offensive team runs from a far distance to acquire acceleration and vaults onto the horse with their hands, one by one. Once the first jumper lands on the end of the horse, there is no more space for the next jumper. In this regard, the first of several jumpers should move on to the front side of the horse. If a jumper falls or a foot of the riders on the back of the horse touches the ground, the teams change their respective roles. On the other hand, if the line of the defensive team collapses because the team is simply too weak, they continue on to the next round without switching roles. If the line holds up until the last rider, the front players of both teams play a round of Gawi Bawi Bo. The winning team then plays offense in the next round as the game continues.