Ttangjaemeokgi

Ttangjaemeokgi

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game expanding territories within the boundary of a square or a round game board drawn on a flat area of dirt.

Ttangjaemeokgi was also called ttangppaetgi, ttangttagi, or ttangttameokgi. The game was played by three or four children on flat ground. Since the game required minimum tools with minimal rules, Ttangjaemeokgi was played nationwide under almost the same rules in every region.

First, players draw a large square or circle game board on an area of ground that is both flat and soft, and is typically played by three or four people. For example, if four players drew a square board, each player would start from each corner. Players draw their houses at the starting points by putting their thumbs at the corners and drawing sectors with index or middle fingers. They try to stretch the finger as wide as they can to draw large houses. Once the first houses are drawn, players keep playing Gawi Bawi Bo and the winners keep drawing other houses to enlarge their territories. Only one last winner or two winners of Gawi Bawi Bo can draw the houses, according to the predetermined rules prior to playing the game.

Ttangjaemeokgi is a game where only the winners of Gawi Bawi Bo keep expanding their territories, while there is also a slightly more difficult version called Ttangttameokgi, as well. Players of Ttangttameokgi also draw a game board and expand their territories from each house, but the method of expansion is different. This game uses game pieces to play called mal (also called mang), which are made of finely ground, flat and round stones or broken pieces of chinaware. First, players determine the playing order before each player flicks his or her mal three times using the thumb and index finger. A mal needs to return to the house it departed from within the three flicks. Upon failure to do, the next sequential player take his or her turn. However, upon success, the area within the path of a mal moved becomes the player’s territory. If a mal cannot return to its house or exceeds the boundaries of the board due to excessive force, the player cannot expand the territory. Players draw a line following the path of the mal once flicked. If a mal returns to its house within three flicks, the lines become a new boundary and the player erases the previous lines within the territory. The game ends when there is no space to claim as territory.

Ttangjaemeokgi was played by children of all ages who could play Gawi Bawi Bo, yet was typically enjoyed by children aged ten or over due to precise control required for the flicking. There were more complicated rules for Ttangttameokgi, including taking over other players’ territories.

Ttangjaemeokgi

Ttangjaemeokgi
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game expanding territories within the boundary of a square or a round game board drawn on a flat area of dirt.

Ttangjaemeokgi was also called ttangppaetgi, ttangttagi, or ttangttameokgi. The game was played by three or four children on flat ground. Since the game required minimum tools with minimal rules, Ttangjaemeokgi was played nationwide under almost the same rules in every region.

First, players draw a large square or circle game board on an area of ground that is both flat and soft, and is typically played by three or four people. For example, if four players drew a square board, each player would start from each corner. Players draw their houses at the starting points by putting their thumbs at the corners and drawing sectors with index or middle fingers. They try to stretch the finger as wide as they can to draw large houses. Once the first houses are drawn, players keep playing Gawi Bawi Bo and the winners keep drawing other houses to enlarge their territories. Only one last winner or two winners of Gawi Bawi Bo can draw the houses, according to the predetermined rules prior to playing the game.

Ttangjaemeokgi is a game where only the winners of Gawi Bawi Bo keep expanding their territories, while there is also a slightly more difficult version called Ttangttameokgi, as well. Players of Ttangttameokgi also draw a game board and expand their territories from each house, but the method of expansion is different. This game uses game pieces to play called mal (also called mang), which are made of finely ground, flat and round stones or broken pieces of chinaware. First, players determine the playing order before each player flicks his or her mal three times using the thumb and index finger. A mal needs to return to the house it departed from within the three flicks. Upon failure to do, the next sequential player take his or her turn. However, upon success, the area within the path of a mal moved becomes the player’s territory. If a mal cannot return to its house or exceeds the boundaries of the board due to excessive force, the player cannot expand the territory. Players draw a line following the path of the mal once flicked. If a mal returns to its house within three flicks, the lines become a new boundary and the player erases the previous lines within the territory. The game ends when there is no space to claim as territory.

Ttangjaemeokgi was played by children of all ages who could play Gawi Bawi Bo, yet was typically enjoyed by children aged ten or over due to precise control required for the flicking. There were more complicated rules for Ttangttameokgi, including taking over other players’ territories.