Ttakjichigi

Ttakjichigi

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game taking each other’s ttakji made of paper by hitting and flipping them over on the ground.

Ttakjis (flat and square game pieces) were mostly made with many types of paper, including old book covers, notes, calendars, cement bags, or animal feed bags. The shapes were square or rectangular, and the sizes varied upon the individual making it. Ttakjis made of big and thick paper were called wangttakji (a giant ttakji) and considered more valuable in game play. There were a number of unique ways to play Ttakjichigi in each region as described below:

① Neomgyeomeokgi (Flipping): Players decide the order to play with a round Gawi Bawi Bo. The losers place their ttakji on the ground, while the winner tries to get them to flip over by hitting them. The player that flips over the other players’ ttakji takes it.
② Nallyeomeokgi (Throwing): Players hold and throw a ttakji with one hand, and the one to throw it the farthest takes the other players’ ttakji. Another way to play this version is by drawing a line on the ground and throwing a ttakji to fall precisely on it to take the other players’ ttakji.
③ Byeokchigi (Hitting a Wall): Players strike ttakji on a wall and the one whose ttakji bounces back the farthest takes the other players’ ttakji.
④ Mireonaegi (Pushing out): Players draw a circle on the ground and place a ttakji inside it. They can place one ttakji per each player, or set a higher amount to place per player before starting the game. Players win the other players’ ttakji by striking down other players’ ttakji and pushing them out of the circle. Players striking down their ttakji and leaving them in the circle by mistake lose them as well.

Besides the square ttakji made by children themselves, round ttakji sold at stationery stores were quite popular as well. To win or lose a round ttakji felt even more significant because children had to pay for them. Popular cartoon characters of the times were drawn on most of the round ttakji. The round ones were loved nationwide from the 1970s to 1990s, before declining in popularity as children did not value ttakjis anymore. The small and lightweight properties of the round ttakjis often led to children applying different playstyles with them, like hitting and flipping over square ttakjis.

Ttakjichigi was mostly played by boys in yards or empty lots, by two or more people. The shapes of ttakjis varied between either a square, triangular, or circle. Today, the game is not played anymore due to the decrease of value in paper, and without that value, children no longer would treat them with care. Instead, metal or plastic ttakjis are popular among today’s children. This new form of ttakji cannot be made by children themselves, however, and can only be bought. Children, therefore, become more aware of its monetary value, leading their thinking twice about the commercial and speculative side of things. Children in Southeast Asian countries, such as Nepal and India, also play with round ttakji in a way that is similar to the Korean version.

Ttakjichigi

Ttakjichigi
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game taking each other’s ttakji made of paper by hitting and flipping them over on the ground.

Ttakjis (flat and square game pieces) were mostly made with many types of paper, including old book covers, notes, calendars, cement bags, or animal feed bags. The shapes were square or rectangular, and the sizes varied upon the individual making it. Ttakjis made of big and thick paper were called wangttakji (a giant ttakji) and considered more valuable in game play. There were a number of unique ways to play Ttakjichigi in each region as described below:

① Neomgyeomeokgi (Flipping): Players decide the order to play with a round Gawi Bawi Bo. The losers place their ttakji on the ground, while the winner tries to get them to flip over by hitting them. The player that flips over the other players’ ttakji takes it.
② Nallyeomeokgi (Throwing): Players hold and throw a ttakji with one hand, and the one to throw it the farthest takes the other players’ ttakji. Another way to play this version is by drawing a line on the ground and throwing a ttakji to fall precisely on it to take the other players’ ttakji.
③ Byeokchigi (Hitting a Wall): Players strike ttakji on a wall and the one whose ttakji bounces back the farthest takes the other players’ ttakji.
④ Mireonaegi (Pushing out): Players draw a circle on the ground and place a ttakji inside it. They can place one ttakji per each player, or set a higher amount to place per player before starting the game. Players win the other players’ ttakji by striking down other players’ ttakji and pushing them out of the circle. Players striking down their ttakji and leaving them in the circle by mistake lose them as well.

Besides the square ttakji made by children themselves, round ttakji sold at stationery stores were quite popular as well. To win or lose a round ttakji felt even more significant because children had to pay for them. Popular cartoon characters of the times were drawn on most of the round ttakji. The round ones were loved nationwide from the 1970s to 1990s, before declining in popularity as children did not value ttakjis anymore. The small and lightweight properties of the round ttakjis often led to children applying different playstyles with them, like hitting and flipping over square ttakjis.

Ttakjichigi was mostly played by boys in yards or empty lots, by two or more people. The shapes of ttakjis varied between either a square, triangular, or circle. Today, the game is not played anymore due to the decrease of value in paper, and without that value, children no longer would treat them with care. Instead, metal or plastic ttakjis are popular among today’s children. This new form of ttakji cannot be made by children themselves, however, and can only be bought. Children, therefore, become more aware of its monetary value, leading their thinking twice about the commercial and speculative side of things. Children in Southeast Asian countries, such as Nepal and India, also play with round ttakji in a way that is similar to the Korean version.