Nat Chigi Nori

Nat Chigi Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game throwing sickles at trees to hang or stick from a certain distance while cutting a tree and/or grass on a mountainside.

Nat Chigi Nori was typically enjoyed by grown children or teenagers. In the past, cutting grass and trees was part of the mundane every life of children in farming or mountain villages. Grass was fed to cows or used to make compost for farming, while trees were used as firewood. As such, cutting grass and trees was an important task in traditional societies. However, this kind of work was not done in a hasty manner and required some breaks, which was when the game was traditionally played. This game was played across the country with small differences between the different types. Typically, the one succeeding in throwing and sticking a sickle in the ground wins a bundle of firewood or grass. Under another rule, the one getting a sickle to hang on a tree, after having thrown it, is declared the winner.

Before starting the game, the players cut down a certain amount of grass, gather it into a heap, and fix a stick in the middle of it. According to the outcome of rock-paper-scissors, they decide the order of the turn and throw a sickle toward the stick. Players have to give the whole portion of grass to the winner who succeeds at getting the sickle to hang on the stick, which rarely happens. Therefore, players were ranked depending on the proximity of their sickle to the stick, which led to different opinions and, ultimately, scuffles in disagreement. The loser, whose grass is taken away, has to stay behind to cut the grass or trees, before returning home late.

There is another rule where players pile up their bundle of grass or firewood nice and high and throw their sickle from a distance of 3 - 4 m, one by one. A player who sticks the sickle to one’s bundle wins. It is difficult to throw a sickle over a great distance in order to precisely stick a sickle to a stack of grass or firewood set at a higher location. The one to stick a sickle accurately takes all the bundles, resulting in some children routinely practicing throwing a sickle.

The game with firewood applies different rules as it is played on a mildlyinclined slope, rather than on a flat ground. The starting point is then marked with a leaf of a tree of grass. This time, however, a sickle is not tossed, but rolled. The player able to roll a sickle the farthest wins all the bundles of firewood. A well-skilled player makes the hilt of their sickle shorter so that it can roll further.

The game eventually disappeared as people no longer cut down trees or long grass, however, it still remains a memorable game for those who spent their childhood in rural communities from the 1950s to the 1970s.

Nat Chigi Nori

Nat Chigi Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game throwing sickles at trees to hang or stick from a certain distance while cutting a tree and/or grass on a mountainside.

Nat Chigi Nori was typically enjoyed by grown children or teenagers. In the past, cutting grass and trees was part of the mundane every life of children in farming or mountain villages. Grass was fed to cows or used to make compost for farming, while trees were used as firewood. As such, cutting grass and trees was an important task in traditional societies. However, this kind of work was not done in a hasty manner and required some breaks, which was when the game was traditionally played. This game was played across the country with small differences between the different types. Typically, the one succeeding in throwing and sticking a sickle in the ground wins a bundle of firewood or grass. Under another rule, the one getting a sickle to hang on a tree, after having thrown it, is declared the winner.

Before starting the game, the players cut down a certain amount of grass, gather it into a heap, and fix a stick in the middle of it. According to the outcome of rock-paper-scissors, they decide the order of the turn and throw a sickle toward the stick. Players have to give the whole portion of grass to the winner who succeeds at getting the sickle to hang on the stick, which rarely happens. Therefore, players were ranked depending on the proximity of their sickle to the stick, which led to different opinions and, ultimately, scuffles in disagreement. The loser, whose grass is taken away, has to stay behind to cut the grass or trees, before returning home late.

There is another rule where players pile up their bundle of grass or firewood nice and high and throw their sickle from a distance of 3 - 4 m, one by one. A player who sticks the sickle to one’s bundle wins. It is difficult to throw a sickle over a great distance in order to precisely stick a sickle to a stack of grass or firewood set at a higher location. The one to stick a sickle accurately takes all the bundles, resulting in some children routinely practicing throwing a sickle.

The game with firewood applies different rules as it is played on a mildlyinclined slope, rather than on a flat ground. The starting point is then marked with a leaf of a tree of grass. This time, however, a sickle is not tossed, but rolled. The player able to roll a sickle the farthest wins all the bundles of firewood. A well-skilled player makes the hilt of their sickle shorter so that it can roll further.

The game eventually disappeared as people no longer cut down trees or long grass, however, it still remains a memorable game for those who spent their childhood in rural communities from the 1950s to the 1970s.