Kkaegeumbalssaum

Kkaegeumbalssaum

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game involving players colliding with each other to knock down their opponent while standing on one leg by bending the other leg forward or backward and holding it with their hands.

Kkaekkeumjil is a dialect for the word, anggamjil, or hopping, while The Kkaegeumbalssaum Battle is also called Dakssaum (chicken fight). It can be referred to as Mureupssaum (knee fighting), as the players knees collide with each other, as well as, Oebalssaum (one-legged fighting), since only one leg is used to stand on while the other one is lifted. Unlike other animals, humans have to learn how to walk. Standing on one foot and hopping can be regarded as an extension of walking practice. At first, the goal of these activities was to stand on one foot for as long as possible, or to go as far as possible by hopping. However, later on, Kkaegeumbalssaum was developed as a competition measuring the players’ strength and technique. It is easy to play and requires no preparation. In fact, its popularity extends beyond that of children into adults whenever there is time. This is an independent game, yet can also be used as a part of other games.

Usually, male adults, or children, play this game by trying to push each other down using their body while standing on only the left foot with the right leg bended and held behind their back. Sometimes, there is a circle drawn on the ground that forms a kind of a ring where players try to push opponents outside of the ring or simply knock down opponents.

During contact with opponents, players use their shoulders, head, or torso, to push opponents, as the use of hands is prohibited. Once a player falls, is knocked down, or stands on two feet after losing balance, the game is over.

Kkaegeumbalssaum is also enjoyed on a larger scale in competitive nori, such as Squid Nori. In that case, it functions as more of a larger game, rather than a separate game.

Around the age of 10, the body of a child starts to mature and gains more strength. Children can then find out just how much they have grown through comparing themselves with others. However, most children tend to think they are stronger than they actually are, giving them a chance to objectively verify their strength through this game.

Kkaegeumbalssaum

Kkaegeumbalssaum
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game involving players colliding with each other to knock down their opponent while standing on one leg by bending the other leg forward or backward and holding it with their hands.

Kkaekkeumjil is a dialect for the word, anggamjil, or hopping, while The Kkaegeumbalssaum Battle is also called Dakssaum (chicken fight). It can be referred to as Mureupssaum (knee fighting), as the players knees collide with each other, as well as, Oebalssaum (one-legged fighting), since only one leg is used to stand on while the other one is lifted. Unlike other animals, humans have to learn how to walk. Standing on one foot and hopping can be regarded as an extension of walking practice. At first, the goal of these activities was to stand on one foot for as long as possible, or to go as far as possible by hopping. However, later on, Kkaegeumbalssaum was developed as a competition measuring the players’ strength and technique. It is easy to play and requires no preparation. In fact, its popularity extends beyond that of children into adults whenever there is time. This is an independent game, yet can also be used as a part of other games.

Usually, male adults, or children, play this game by trying to push each other down using their body while standing on only the left foot with the right leg bended and held behind their back. Sometimes, there is a circle drawn on the ground that forms a kind of a ring where players try to push opponents outside of the ring or simply knock down opponents.

During contact with opponents, players use their shoulders, head, or torso, to push opponents, as the use of hands is prohibited. Once a player falls, is knocked down, or stands on two feet after losing balance, the game is over.

Kkaegeumbalssaum is also enjoyed on a larger scale in competitive nori, such as Squid Nori. In that case, it functions as more of a larger game, rather than a separate game.

Around the age of 10, the body of a child starts to mature and gains more strength. Children can then find out just how much they have grown through comparing themselves with others. However, most children tend to think they are stronger than they actually are, giving them a chance to objectively verify their strength through this game.