Gitdae Seugi Nori

Gitdae Seugi Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game consisting of removing dirt from a mound without knocking down a wooden stick, fixed in the middle of the mound.

Gitdae Seugi Nori uses fine earth as sand or mud is not suitable for game play. Three or four people can play this game together, sometimes in teams. Traditionally, the game was played in a vacant lot or at the corner of a playing field. It was called by various names, including Gitdae Sseureotteurigi (Knocking Down a Stick), Heuk Ttameokgi (Getting the Dirt), and Heuk Ppaeatgi (Taking the Dirt).

In order to play this game, players select a location and gather the dirt high into a high mound, before sitting around it. After the dirt is gathered to make a small mountain with a peak, a wooden stick is placed in the middle of it. Following a round of rock-paper-scissors to determine the sequence of play. During a turn, the players can take any amount of dirt from the pile, using both or either hand, which should be determined beforehand. As the players take some of the dirt, the pile gradually gets smaller to the point where the stick falls down and the game ends. At first, the players may try to grab a large amount of dirt, however, as the pile grows smaller and the stick is about to fall, players will try to take the least amount possible. Players begin checking all the possible angles to carefully determine from where to take the dirt, since the point of the game is not the amount of dirt taken, but rather, who is the one to accidentally make the stick fall. Even a player who has taken the largest amount of dirt may lose the game if the player knocks down the stick. In this case, the player receives a predetermined penalty, or is simply designated as the last player in the next game.

Due to the gradual urbanization over the years, games using dirt are almost non-existent. In fact, possible issues with hygiene often cause children to rarely play with dirt even if it is around. As such, modern-day children are strangers to this game, despite it being commonly found during the 1970s and 1980s.

Gitdae Seugi Nori

Gitdae Seugi Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game consisting of removing dirt from a mound without knocking down a wooden stick, fixed in the middle of the mound.

Gitdae Seugi Nori uses fine earth as sand or mud is not suitable for game play. Three or four people can play this game together, sometimes in teams. Traditionally, the game was played in a vacant lot or at the corner of a playing field. It was called by various names, including Gitdae Sseureotteurigi (Knocking Down a Stick), Heuk Ttameokgi (Getting the Dirt), and Heuk Ppaeatgi (Taking the Dirt).

In order to play this game, players select a location and gather the dirt high into a high mound, before sitting around it. After the dirt is gathered to make a small mountain with a peak, a wooden stick is placed in the middle of it. Following a round of rock-paper-scissors to determine the sequence of play. During a turn, the players can take any amount of dirt from the pile, using both or either hand, which should be determined beforehand. As the players take some of the dirt, the pile gradually gets smaller to the point where the stick falls down and the game ends. At first, the players may try to grab a large amount of dirt, however, as the pile grows smaller and the stick is about to fall, players will try to take the least amount possible. Players begin checking all the possible angles to carefully determine from where to take the dirt, since the point of the game is not the amount of dirt taken, but rather, who is the one to accidentally make the stick fall. Even a player who has taken the largest amount of dirt may lose the game if the player knocks down the stick. In this case, the player receives a predetermined penalty, or is simply designated as the last player in the next game.

Due to the gradual urbanization over the years, games using dirt are almost non-existent. In fact, possible issues with hygiene often cause children to rarely play with dirt even if it is around. As such, modern-day children are strangers to this game, despite it being commonly found during the 1970s and 1980s.