Goeulmodum

Goeulmodum

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game to decide a winner by summing up the names of goeuls with the letters in a randomly opened page of a book and asking questions regarding the goeuls.

Goeulmodum was made to teach children the names and locations of goeuls (villages) in an age without transportation or long-range communication methods. It also could develop enough popularity as only the children who had learnt Chinese characters at a seodang (village school) could play the game.

A more recent version of the game can be seen today that uses a complete map of Korea. For example, while playing, a person says, “Incheon, ” and the other people find the city on the map. The first finder then gets to say the name of another city, and so on. Another way to play goeulmodum was to make as many names as possible with the given characters in a randomly opened page of a book. For example, if the players found a sentence, “Areumdaun yeonghoniyeo, geu juineun nuguinga?” (Oh beautiful soul, who is your master?) They can select the city name, Yeongju, by reorganizing the letters in the sentence (yeong of yeonghon and ju of juin). Likewise, they could create other city names, such as Yeoju (yeo of yeonghoniyeo and ju of juin). The person with the most location names wins. A more advanced version consists of not only coming up with location names, but also asking questions about the places. If a person says, Yeongju, other people inquire further asking things like, “Which province does Yeongju belong to?” Unless the right answer is provided, “Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, ” the person loses points. This style of game play requires a certain level of understanding about the places of Korea; hence the game being primarily enjoyed by children ten years and older.

Additionally, there was a game named ramseungdo (namseungdo). The game uses a board filled with the names of famous places in Korea. Players move game pieces on the board by rolling a die, or yunmok (a pentagonal stick), to spaces on the board where names of famous places and other locations in the provinces of Joseon were written. This game was helpful in learning the names of not only ordinary places, but also places featuring beautiful scenery or historical significance. According to writings of foreigners who had visited Korea during the late Joseon Period, they found that Koreans had an affinity for travelling. In particular, according to the book, Chosun: The Land of the Morning Calm, by an American writer named Percival Lowell, who wrote that the people of Joseon were very fond of travelling, not only more than Americans, but also middle-class Europeans as well.

Goeulmodum

Goeulmodum
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game to decide a winner by summing up the names of goeuls with the letters in a randomly opened page of a book and asking questions regarding the goeuls.

Goeulmodum was made to teach children the names and locations of goeuls (villages) in an age without transportation or long-range communication methods. It also could develop enough popularity as only the children who had learnt Chinese characters at a seodang (village school) could play the game.

A more recent version of the game can be seen today that uses a complete map of Korea. For example, while playing, a person says, “Incheon, ” and the other people find the city on the map. The first finder then gets to say the name of another city, and so on. Another way to play goeulmodum was to make as many names as possible with the given characters in a randomly opened page of a book. For example, if the players found a sentence, “Areumdaun yeonghoniyeo, geu juineun nuguinga?” (Oh beautiful soul, who is your master?) They can select the city name, Yeongju, by reorganizing the letters in the sentence (yeong of yeonghon and ju of juin). Likewise, they could create other city names, such as Yeoju (yeo of yeonghoniyeo and ju of juin). The person with the most location names wins. A more advanced version consists of not only coming up with location names, but also asking questions about the places. If a person says, Yeongju, other people inquire further asking things like, “Which province does Yeongju belong to?” Unless the right answer is provided, “Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, ” the person loses points. This style of game play requires a certain level of understanding about the places of Korea; hence the game being primarily enjoyed by children ten years and older.

Additionally, there was a game named ramseungdo (namseungdo). The game uses a board filled with the names of famous places in Korea. Players move game pieces on the board by rolling a die, or yunmok (a pentagonal stick), to spaces on the board where names of famous places and other locations in the provinces of Joseon were written. This game was helpful in learning the names of not only ordinary places, but also places featuring beautiful scenery or historical significance. According to writings of foreigners who had visited Korea during the late Joseon Period, they found that Koreans had an affinity for travelling. In particular, according to the book, Chosun: The Land of the Morning Calm, by an American writer named Percival Lowell, who wrote that the people of Joseon were very fond of travelling, not only more than Americans, but also middle-class Europeans as well.