Gogomae Nori

Gogomae Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game hanging the feathers of geese, ducks, or chickens by strings, which was typically enjoyed by children on Jeongwol Daeboreum.

Birds were the often object of desire among humans as the flew freely in the sky, leading to. numerous attempts having been made to embody the features of birds. The most basic means to accomplish this task was to run with a thread attached with lightweight leaves or bird feathers. However, the thread would immediately fall to the ground once the running has stopped, spurring on its evolution into a kite. Kites come in various shapes and sizes, yet the act of flying a kite can be seen all throughout the world. In addition to flying a kite, there is another means that attempts to realize the desire for flight called Gogomae Nori. According to old literature and references, it is said that during the winter season when the wind is dry and strong, the feathers of geese and other birds, if attached to a thin thread (preferably silk, which is thinner and lighter than cotton) will float in the air. As the feathers remain tied to the thread, they simply bob up and down in the air with children jumping around trying to catch the moving feathers. Leaves or plastic bags tied to the end of the string produce the same effect and whenever the wind doesn’t blow strong enough, children may run with the thread in hand to make the kite fly through the air.

Flying a kite requires a number of materials, not to mention a knack for making it. However, Gogomae Nori only needs a moderate length of thread and the feathers of birds, which can be easily obtained from one’s yard. Essentially, it serves as a convenient substitute for a kite, especially for children that may not be able to afford one in the first place. Gogomae Nori is presumed to have been primarily enjoyed by children.

Gogomae Nori

Gogomae Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game hanging the feathers of geese, ducks, or chickens by strings, which was typically enjoyed by children on Jeongwol Daeboreum.

Birds were the often object of desire among humans as the flew freely in the sky, leading to. numerous attempts having been made to embody the features of birds. The most basic means to accomplish this task was to run with a thread attached with lightweight leaves or bird feathers. However, the thread would immediately fall to the ground once the running has stopped, spurring on its evolution into a kite. Kites come in various shapes and sizes, yet the act of flying a kite can be seen all throughout the world. In addition to flying a kite, there is another means that attempts to realize the desire for flight called Gogomae Nori. According to old literature and references, it is said that during the winter season when the wind is dry and strong, the feathers of geese and other birds, if attached to a thin thread (preferably silk, which is thinner and lighter than cotton) will float in the air. As the feathers remain tied to the thread, they simply bob up and down in the air with children jumping around trying to catch the moving feathers. Leaves or plastic bags tied to the end of the string produce the same effect and whenever the wind doesn’t blow strong enough, children may run with the thread in hand to make the kite fly through the air.

Flying a kite requires a number of materials, not to mention a knack for making it. However, Gogomae Nori only needs a moderate length of thread and the feathers of birds, which can be easily obtained from one’s yard. Essentially, it serves as a convenient substitute for a kite, especially for children that may not be able to afford one in the first place. Gogomae Nori is presumed to have been primarily enjoyed by children.