Gangneung Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori

Gangneung Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer JangJungryong(張正龍)

A folk custom played in Hapyeong-ri of Sacheon-myeon, Gangneung, Gangwon-do Province, every February 6th of the lunar calendar involving villagers cross the bridge in front of the Hapyeong Village as they wish for a good harvest.

Gangneug Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori commences with a darigut (a shamanic ritual for darijipgi) before a 5 m tall gate made of songari (pine tree branches) at the entrance of the bridge. The gate is a shamanic symbol that prevents misfortune. Every participant of the daribapgi, or Hwaetbulssaum, must pass through the gate to participate in the events.

Darigut is the first stage of Hapyeong Village’s daribapgi ceremony on Jomsangnal (February 6th of the lunar calendar). The sangsoe (leader) of the nongakdae (village folk band) takes a bow before the offering at the seonghwangdang (village shrine) in front of the entrance. The sangsoe recites gosaban starting with, “Come forth! Come forth! Seonangnim (a spirit protecting the village), come before us. We are joined by Guksaseonang (another name of Seonangnim), now in the month of February…”, before the crowd moves to the bridge. The nonggisu (flag bearer) leads the march, and a taepyeongso (a wind instrument) player, along with the sangsoe and nongakdae, follow in line. The band then heads toward the bridge, playing music led by the sangsoe. At the bridge entrance, the sangsoe shouts in a loud voice, “Sullyeongsu, please grant us a good harvest when we cross this bridge on Jomsangnal of February, in the year of OO.” The rest of the band and torch bearers respond with a, “Hooray!” and the jegwans (operators of the ritual) place a cow’s head and other offerings facing the east and take a bow, while the other villagers follow in suit with a bow as well. Next, the sangsoe beats soegarak (musical beats played by the sangsoe) and recites, “Oh wow! What a wonderfully made bridge! Let us make our way across, ” then the others repeat in chorus. When the band reaches the middle of the bridge, they call sullyeongsu, saying “Sullyeongsu, please cross this bridge on the Jomsangnal of February in the year of OO and grant us a good harvest, ” before continuing the bridge crossing. The villagers holding torches follow the nongakdae, wishing only for good fortune for the year and for their legs to remain in good health.

The second stage is soejeolgeum. It means soegyeorum, a musical duel between the sangsoes of Hapyeong Village and Jilli Village. They use every 12 Chae Garak (Twelve-strike Rhythm) of Hapyeongnongak (folk music of Hapyeong Village) and put their skills on display. The soegarak includes ilche, ichae, samchae, sachae, gillori, gutgeori, and gusikgillori.

Their rhythms are fast with simple 3/4 and 4/4 times, but are distinguished by melodies using 7 to 8 rhythms. Most soegaraks repeat a single melody at length.

The third stage is a battle of stones called Seokjeon, where people are divided into two teams and throw stones at each other, a tradition customarily held on Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar) that involved Hapyeong villagers throwing small walnut-sized stones to imitate a battle. This custom, however, is no longer carried out due to safety concerns as people often got injured in the past.

The fourth stage is a hwaetbulssaum. During the daytime on Jomsangnal, young villagers create torches with bush clovers or straw according to the number of family members. That night, they go out into the field with the nongakdae and form two battle formations, representing the two villages. At moonrise, a leader of one team shouts, “Sullyeongsu!” to the other team, before the other team retorts with a harsh response, “kkollaekkollae!” (a word used for mocking). After a mutual exchange of harsh words, towels are then wrapped around their heads, torches are lit, and the teams march forward upon the start of the music. One team shouts, “Bring it on!” and takes the initial swing of the torches, with the other team swinging back. As the battle ensues with both teams trying to hit and knock down one another with their torches, people naturally start to surrender. The team losing the most members ultimately loses the battle. The battle is then concluded with the putting out of the torches. Essentially, two torch battles are carried out, with the villagers and children engaging each other separately. It is traditionally believed that the losing village will suffer a bad harvest, and the winning village will enjoy a good harvest for the year. Following the torch battle, the villagers of the two villages cross the bridge to light a bonfire with the used torches, and then return to their villages to enjoy the rest of the night in celebration. A farming season for the year starts after the Jomsangnal, meaning that it is the last the day for fun and relaxation during the farming off-season. In the past, a rice wine called, jomsangju, was given to the nongakdae. Jomsangju was made from the rice donated by every household of the village to be enjoyed by every villager. In the past, there was a place called, chogunbang, or dobang, in the village, at which the nongakdae gathered. The wealthier households then became responsible for making jomsangju.

Gangneung Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori

Gangneung Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer JangJungryong(張正龍)

A folk custom played in Hapyeong-ri of Sacheon-myeon, Gangneung, Gangwon-do Province, every February 6th of the lunar calendar involving villagers cross the bridge in front of the Hapyeong Village as they wish for a good harvest.

Gangneug Sacheon Hapyeong Dapgyo Nori commences with a darigut (a shamanic ritual for darijipgi) before a 5 m tall gate made of songari (pine tree branches) at the entrance of the bridge. The gate is a shamanic symbol that prevents misfortune. Every participant of the daribapgi, or Hwaetbulssaum, must pass through the gate to participate in the events.

Darigut is the first stage of Hapyeong Village’s daribapgi ceremony on Jomsangnal (February 6th of the lunar calendar). The sangsoe (leader) of the nongakdae (village folk band) takes a bow before the offering at the seonghwangdang (village shrine) in front of the entrance. The sangsoe recites gosaban starting with, “Come forth! Come forth! Seonangnim (a spirit protecting the village), come before us. We are joined by Guksaseonang (another name of Seonangnim), now in the month of February…”, before the crowd moves to the bridge. The nonggisu (flag bearer) leads the march, and a taepyeongso (a wind instrument) player, along with the sangsoe and nongakdae, follow in line. The band then heads toward the bridge, playing music led by the sangsoe. At the bridge entrance, the sangsoe shouts in a loud voice, “Sullyeongsu, please grant us a good harvest when we cross this bridge on Jomsangnal of February, in the year of OO.” The rest of the band and torch bearers respond with a, “Hooray!” and the jegwans (operators of the ritual) place a cow’s head and other offerings facing the east and take a bow, while the other villagers follow in suit with a bow as well. Next, the sangsoe beats soegarak (musical beats played by the sangsoe) and recites, “Oh wow! What a wonderfully made bridge! Let us make our way across, ” then the others repeat in chorus. When the band reaches the middle of the bridge, they call sullyeongsu, saying “Sullyeongsu, please cross this bridge on the Jomsangnal of February in the year of OO and grant us a good harvest, ” before continuing the bridge crossing. The villagers holding torches follow the nongakdae, wishing only for good fortune for the year and for their legs to remain in good health.

The second stage is soejeolgeum. It means soegyeorum, a musical duel between the sangsoes of Hapyeong Village and Jilli Village. They use every 12 Chae Garak (Twelve-strike Rhythm) of Hapyeongnongak (folk music of Hapyeong Village) and put their skills on display. The soegarak includes ilche, ichae, samchae, sachae, gillori, gutgeori, and gusikgillori.

Their rhythms are fast with simple 3/4 and 4/4 times, but are distinguished by melodies using 7 to 8 rhythms. Most soegaraks repeat a single melody at length.

The third stage is a battle of stones called Seokjeon, where people are divided into two teams and throw stones at each other, a tradition customarily held on Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar) that involved Hapyeong villagers throwing small walnut-sized stones to imitate a battle. This custom, however, is no longer carried out due to safety concerns as people often got injured in the past.

The fourth stage is a hwaetbulssaum. During the daytime on Jomsangnal, young villagers create torches with bush clovers or straw according to the number of family members. That night, they go out into the field with the nongakdae and form two battle formations, representing the two villages. At moonrise, a leader of one team shouts, “Sullyeongsu!” to the other team, before the other team retorts with a harsh response, “kkollaekkollae!” (a word used for mocking). After a mutual exchange of harsh words, towels are then wrapped around their heads, torches are lit, and the teams march forward upon the start of the music. One team shouts, “Bring it on!” and takes the initial swing of the torches, with the other team swinging back. As the battle ensues with both teams trying to hit and knock down one another with their torches, people naturally start to surrender. The team losing the most members ultimately loses the battle. The battle is then concluded with the putting out of the torches. Essentially, two torch battles are carried out, with the villagers and children engaging each other separately. It is traditionally believed that the losing village will suffer a bad harvest, and the winning village will enjoy a good harvest for the year. Following the torch battle, the villagers of the two villages cross the bridge to light a bonfire with the used torches, and then return to their villages to enjoy the rest of the night in celebration. A farming season for the year starts after the Jomsangnal, meaning that it is the last the day for fun and relaxation during the farming off-season. In the past, a rice wine called, jomsangju, was given to the nongakdae. Jomsangju was made from the rice donated by every household of the village to be enjoyed by every villager. In the past, there was a place called, chogunbang, or dobang, in the village, at which the nongakdae gathered. The wealthier households then became responsible for making jomsangju.