Garakji Chatgi Nori

Garakji Chatgi Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game traditionally played indoors that involves girls or grown adult women trying to find a hidden garakji or other small objects.

This game is referred to as Garakji Chatgi Nori, but also goes by Garakji Gamchigi Nori. Other types of items can be used for the game, as well, which changes the name of the game. For example, the game is called Binyeo Passing when a binyeo (a hairpin) is used; Jongji Passing for jongji (a small dish); and Kong Sumgigi for a bean. The game is played by approximately ten women. First, someone has to be “it, ” or the finder. The finder, also be called tiger or cat, then sits in the middle of the other players already sitting in a circle. The finder can either simply bow her head down, or cover her eyes. Other players then begin to sing a song while passing the garakji around.

The players pass the garakji under their skirts or knees to either their right or left. They have to conceal their movement from the finder while being careful not to drop the garakji. The passing stops when the song ends, or the finder says “stop.” The finder proceeds to look for the ring from that point on. Other players may try to confuse the finder with their words or actions. The finder focuses on the facial expression and posture of other players to find the keeper, and then point to the person she believes has the garakji. If the person is caught, she becomes the next finder. If not, the current finder continues as the finder for the next round. A penalty may also be given to the finder once unable to identify keeper correctly upon agreement prior to starting the game.

People who have played the game said they did so indoor when it was cold outside during the winter. They saw their mothers and grandmothers playing the game growing up as well, hinting at the game’s long beloved tradition.

When the game is played outdoors by kids, the hider buries a garakji made of a root or a stem of grass under the ground. The other kids then take turns poking at the ground once with a stick to try and find it. It is assumed that the game was initially played outdoors, before being modified to be played indoors later on, while the game rules were also adjusted accordingly.

Garakji Chatgi Nori

Garakji Chatgi Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts > Folk Games

Writer LeeSangho(李相昊)

A game traditionally played indoors that involves girls or grown adult women trying to find a hidden garakji or other small objects.

This game is referred to as Garakji Chatgi Nori, but also goes by Garakji Gamchigi Nori. Other types of items can be used for the game, as well, which changes the name of the game. For example, the game is called Binyeo Passing when a binyeo (a hairpin) is used; Jongji Passing for jongji (a small dish); and Kong Sumgigi for a bean. The game is played by approximately ten women. First, someone has to be “it, ” or the finder. The finder, also be called tiger or cat, then sits in the middle of the other players already sitting in a circle. The finder can either simply bow her head down, or cover her eyes. Other players then begin to sing a song while passing the garakji around.

The players pass the garakji under their skirts or knees to either their right or left. They have to conceal their movement from the finder while being careful not to drop the garakji. The passing stops when the song ends, or the finder says “stop.” The finder proceeds to look for the ring from that point on. Other players may try to confuse the finder with their words or actions. The finder focuses on the facial expression and posture of other players to find the keeper, and then point to the person she believes has the garakji. If the person is caught, she becomes the next finder. If not, the current finder continues as the finder for the next round. A penalty may also be given to the finder once unable to identify keeper correctly upon agreement prior to starting the game.

People who have played the game said they did so indoor when it was cold outside during the winter. They saw their mothers and grandmothers playing the game growing up as well, hinting at the game’s long beloved tradition.

When the game is played outdoors by kids, the hider buries a garakji made of a root or a stem of grass under the ground. The other kids then take turns poking at the ground once with a stick to try and find it. It is assumed that the game was initially played outdoors, before being modified to be played indoors later on, while the game rules were also adjusted accordingly.