Wedding at the bride’s home and the newly-wed couple leaving for the groom’s home the next day(半親迎)

Headword

반친영 ( 半親迎 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer JangByungin(張炳仁)

The marriage custom established during the mid-Joseon Dynasty by combining namgwiyeogahon (Kor. 남귀여가혼, Chin. 男歸女家婚, the tradition of holding the wedding ceremony at the bride’s home and the newly-wed couple living with the bride’s family for a certain period of time) and chinyeonghon (Kor. 친영혼, Chin. 親迎婚, the tradition of holding the marriage ceremony at the bridegroom’s home and the newly-wed couple living with the groom’s family). That is, under a compromise, the wedding ceremony was held at the bride’s house and the newly-wed couple left for the groom’s house the next day for the bride to formally greet her in-laws.

According to the tradition of chinyeonghon, the wedding ceremony took place at the bridegroom’s house in the order of gyobaerye (Kor. 교배례, Chin. 交拜禮, lit. bow-exchanging ceremony) and hapgeullye (Kor. 합근례, Chin. 合巹禮, liquor-sharing ceremony), and the couple spent the wedding night at the groom’s house. On the following day, the bride started her married life with hyeongugorye (Kor. 현구고례, Chin. 見舅姑禮, lit. greetings to the parents-in-law), formally expressing her gratitude to her inlaws for their kindness and support. By contrast, in the tradition of namgwiyeogahon, the wedding ceremony took place three days after the arrival of the bridegroom at the bride’s home, where the couple spent their nights together even before the ceremony. As the couple’s married life started in the bride’s home, it was necessary to select a specific date for the formal meeting between the bride and her parents-in-law. Hardliners of the Neo-Confucian scholar-official class of Joseon fiercely criticized this practice, believing that it ran counter to the principle that yin follows yang, not vice versa. They strongly demanded the introduction of chinyeong to Korean society on the basis of “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi), for they considered it immoral for the couple to sleep together before the wedding ceremony. This was not easily brought about, however, due to the backlash against the seemingly arbitrary change in traditional ways.

The second condition of banchinyeong, the bride’s visit to her parents-in-law the day after the wedding, was found largely unfeasible due to the custom of the newly-wed couple living with the bride’s family for a considerable period after their wedding. The homes of the bride and groom were typically far from each other, and often it was not possible for the couple to return home, that is, to the bride’s home, on the same day after greeting her in-laws. That said, banchinyeong did not die out completely, as it was observed by a small number of families. Even in such cases, the marriage was generally recorded as chinyeong, rather than banchinyeong. The tradition of marrying and living at the bride’s house first was preserved even after the mid-Joseon period, inevitably leading to a decline in weddings held at the groom’s homes, and as banchinyeong incorporated many elements of chinyeong, such weddings tended to be recorded as chinyeong. This explains why there are so few records of banchinyeong, though a number of records of chinyeong have survived. It can be concluded that the records of chinyeong contained in some literary collections published by the literati in Seoul and regional areas are actually record of banchinyeong.

Banchinyeong is characterized by the combination of the traditional Korean marriage custom of namgwiyeogahon with the Chinese traditional custom of chinyeong, and it was observed by some literati families in Seoul after the 16th century. The historical significance of the practice is that it shows a compromise was sought in the Korean wedding tradition rather than a complete change to a custom of foreign origin.

Wedding at the bride’s home and the newly-wed couple leaving for the groom’s home the next day

Wedding at the bride’s home and the newly-wed couple leaving for the groom’s home the next day
Headword

반친영 ( 半親迎 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer JangByungin(張炳仁)

The marriage custom established during the mid-Joseon Dynasty by combining namgwiyeogahon (Kor. 남귀여가혼, Chin. 男歸女家婚, the tradition of holding the wedding ceremony at the bride’s home and the newly-wed couple living with the bride’s family for a certain period of time) and chinyeonghon (Kor. 친영혼, Chin. 親迎婚, the tradition of holding the marriage ceremony at the bridegroom’s home and the newly-wed couple living with the groom’s family). That is, under a compromise, the wedding ceremony was held at the bride’s house and the newly-wed couple left for the groom’s house the next day for the bride to formally greet her in-laws.

According to the tradition of chinyeonghon, the wedding ceremony took place at the bridegroom’s house in the order of gyobaerye (Kor. 교배례, Chin. 交拜禮, lit. bow-exchanging ceremony) and hapgeullye (Kor. 합근례, Chin. 合巹禮, liquor-sharing ceremony), and the couple spent the wedding night at the groom’s house. On the following day, the bride started her married life with hyeongugorye (Kor. 현구고례, Chin. 見舅姑禮, lit. greetings to the parents-in-law), formally expressing her gratitude to her inlaws for their kindness and support. By contrast, in the tradition of namgwiyeogahon, the wedding ceremony took place three days after the arrival of the bridegroom at the bride’s home, where the couple spent their nights together even before the ceremony. As the couple’s married life started in the bride’s home, it was necessary to select a specific date for the formal meeting between the bride and her parents-in-law. Hardliners of the Neo-Confucian scholar-official class of Joseon fiercely criticized this practice, believing that it ran counter to the principle that yin follows yang, not vice versa. They strongly demanded the introduction of chinyeong to Korean society on the basis of “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi), for they considered it immoral for the couple to sleep together before the wedding ceremony. This was not easily brought about, however, due to the backlash against the seemingly arbitrary change in traditional ways.

The second condition of banchinyeong, the bride’s visit to her parents-in-law the day after the wedding, was found largely unfeasible due to the custom of the newly-wed couple living with the bride’s family for a considerable period after their wedding. The homes of the bride and groom were typically far from each other, and often it was not possible for the couple to return home, that is, to the bride’s home, on the same day after greeting her in-laws. That said, banchinyeong did not die out completely, as it was observed by a small number of families. Even in such cases, the marriage was generally recorded as chinyeong, rather than banchinyeong. The tradition of marrying and living at the bride’s house first was preserved even after the mid-Joseon period, inevitably leading to a decline in weddings held at the groom’s homes, and as banchinyeong incorporated many elements of chinyeong, such weddings tended to be recorded as chinyeong. This explains why there are so few records of banchinyeong, though a number of records of chinyeong have survived. It can be concluded that the records of chinyeong contained in some literary collections published by the literati in Seoul and regional areas are actually record of banchinyeong.

Banchinyeong is characterized by the combination of the traditional Korean marriage custom of namgwiyeogahon with the Chinese traditional custom of chinyeong, and it was observed by some literati families in Seoul after the 16th century. The historical significance of the practice is that it shows a compromise was sought in the Korean wedding tradition rather than a complete change to a custom of foreign origin.